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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

■■■Ml 



CONSTITUTION 

AND 

PLAYING RULES 



()!■' THE 



National League 
in- 
Professional Base Ball Clubs 



REVISED 1904 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



PUBLISHED BY 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

NEW YORK AXIi CHIC \'.i> 



MUHHMMfliMMMH«HMM^MHBHaBMM^U|aa 



Constitution of the National League 

of Professional Base Ball Clubs 

1904 



REVISION 



Name. 

SECTION 1. This Association shall be called the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Objects. 

SEC. 2. The objects of this League are: 

1. To immortalize base ball as the national name of the 
; nited States. 

2. To surround it with such safeguards as to warrant 
absolute public confidence in its integrity and methods. 

3. To protect and promote the mutual interests of pro- 
fessional base ball clubs and professional base ball players, 
and 

4. To establish and regulate the professional base ball 
championship of the United States. 

Membership. 
SEC. 3. This League shall consist of eight clubs (the 
membership shall not he increased or diminished except 
by unanimous consent of the League), located in and rep- 
resenting the following cities, to wit : Boston, New York, 
Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, St. Louis 
and Chicago, and in no event shall there he more than one 
club in any city. 

Withdrawal from Membership. 
SEC. 4. Any club member of the League unable to meet 
the obligations it has assumed may a-k the League for per- 
mission to dis'pose of its rights and franchises as a member 
of the League in that city to some other corporation. In 
tin- event of this League giving its consent to the transfer 



4 

of membership from one company to another it must be 
understood thai the new member shall assume with the 
franchise and rights of the retiring company all the lia- 
bilities, responsibilities and obligations entered into by 
the retiring company. It must also be understood by the 
retiring and new company that the company retiring shall 
not be relieved or released from any contract or obligation 
entered into by it to this League until all of said contracts 
and obligations have been fully paid and determined by the 
company accepting its membership, rights and franchises. 

Admission to Membership. 
SEC. 5. A company to be admitted to membership in 
this League must first deliver to the Secretary of the 
League a written application signed by its President and 
Secretary, accompanied by documents showing that such 
company is regularly organized, chartered and officered, and 
is prepared to fully comply with the provisions of Section 4 
of this Constitution. Such application shall at once be 
transmitted by the Secretary to the Board of Directors. 
who shall immediately investigate and report upon said 
application, said report to he communicated to the League 
through the S< cretary. 

SEC. 6. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisite for 
election. 

In Regard to Vacancies. 

SEC. 7. In cast- a vacancy occurs in the membership of 
this organization during the championship season, the Presi 
dent shall nominate to all the clubs all applications for mem- 
bership : and the vote thereon may be taken by telegraph 
or mail, as occasion may require, and a majority of all the 
clubs will be required to admit any applicant to member- 
ship. Such membership, however, shall continue only until 
the next annual meeting, but Mich club shall be subject to 
all the rules and requirements of this organization. 

Termination of Membership. 
SEC. 8. The membership of any club may be terminated : 

1. By resignation duly accepted by a three-fourths vote 
of all club- in meeting duly convened as provided in Sec- 
tion 4. 

2. By failure to present its nine at the time and place 
1 uoon to play any championship game, unless caused 

by unavoidable accident in traveling. 



3. By allowing open betting or pool selling upon its 
grounds or in any building owned or occupied by it. 

4. By playing any game of ball with a club that is dis- 
qualified or ineligible under ibis Constitution. 

5. By offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to lose 
any game of ball; or failing to immediately expel any 
player who -.hall be proven guilty qf offering, agreeing, 
conspiring or attempting to lose any game of ball, or of 
being interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

6. By disbandment of its organization or club team 
during the championship season. 

7. By failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obli- 
gations. 

8. By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful re- 
quirement of the Board of Directors. 

9. By wilfully violating any provision of this Constitu- 
tion, or the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance 
thereof, or any violation of the provisions of the National 
Agreement. 

The Expulsion of Clubs. 
SEC. 9. To carry into effeel the provisions of Section S 
of this Constitution, the fads in any case covered by such 
Section must be reported to the Secretary of the League, 
who shall at once notify by mail or tejegraph the party 
charged with the specified default or offense, and inquire 
whether any dispute exists as to the facts alleged. Tn case 
the facts arc disputed, the Board shall, after due notice, 
try the case under such regulations as they may prescribe; 
and their finding shall be final and conclusive on all parties 
except in case of expulsion, when such finding shall be for- 
warded to each club, which shall transmit to the Secretary 

written ballots "fur Expulsion" or "Against Expulsion"; 
and if seven clubs vote "For Expulsion" the Secretary shall 
notify all clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged. 

Dues and Assessments. 
SEC. 10. 1. Each club shall pay to the Secretary, on or 
before the first day of April of each year, the sum of $100.00 
as annual dues: and such other sums as from time to time 
may be assessed for the payment of salaries of officers and 
umpires, and for such other expenses as may he incurred 
by order of this League or the Hoard of Directors. Also 
all fines and penalties imposed by -aid League or its I!,, aid 
of Directors upon a club or upon any club officer, player. 



manager, scorer, or other employe when so levied and im- 
posed by virtue of, and in accordance with, the provisions 
of this Constitution and the Playing Rules of this League. 
2. Upon conviction of any of the offenses prescribed in 

Section 8 as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors 
may, in the first instance, a- a preliminary to, or in lieu 
of expulsion, impose such a fine as is in their judgment 
commensurate with the injury; which line may include 
a penalty payable to any other club or chilis as an equiva 
lent for damages sustained for such violation of this 
Constitution, or of tin- legislation or contracts made in pur- 
suance thereof. 

Officers. 

SEC. 11. At its annual meeting the League shall elect 
a President and a Secretary-Treasurer and Hoard of Direc 
tors. 'Idle President shall he ex-officio Chairman of the 
Hoard of Directors. He shall report to the Hoard of Direc 
tors any violation of the provisions of this Constitution that 
may come to his knowledge, lie shall be the sole inter 
preter of the Playing Rules during the championship season. 
lie shall preside at all the meetings of the League, and at 
the annual meeting of the League shall act as schedule 
committee, unless said meeting shall otherwise direct. 

Should the office of the President become vacant by 

death, resignation, or removal, the Board of Director- shall. 

within thirty days thereafter, elect a President. The office 

of President and Secretary-Treasurer may he held by the 

person. 

The Secretary's Duties. 

SEC. 12. The Secretary shall lie the Treasurer of the 
League, and as such shall 'he the custodian of all funds of 
the League, receive all dues, fees and entS, which 

shall he placed to the credit of the Treasurer in 

hank of deposit to meet cumin .-poises. He -hall make 

such payments as shall he ordered by the Board or by the 
vote of the Leagw der annually a report of his 

.accounts; and he shall give such bond, with approval sure 

ties, as the Board may require. 

SEC. 13. Idle Secretary -hall have the- custody and care 
of the official r< d papers of the League: shall keep 

a true steuographi. t all meetings of the I 

and the Hoard: shall issue all official notices, ami attend 
to "V ' respondence; he shall also prepan 

furnish such reports as may be called for by the Hoard 



and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, blanks and 
materials as the actual duties of his office may require. 

SEC. 14. The Secretary shall keep a record of all in- 
fractions of the rules and regulations "f the League thai 

may come under his notice, and shall make a report on the 
same to the Board at its next meeting. 

SEC. 15. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the 
Board by vote shall determine, and shall he reimbursed for 
all traveling expenses actually incurred by him in the 
service of the League; and the Hoard may exact from him 
such guarantees for the faithful performance of his duties 
as they would deem for the interest and safely of the 
League. At the expiration of his term of office he shall 
account for. and deliver up to the Hoard, all the property 
and papers which may have come into his hands by virtue 
of his office. 

SEC. 16. The Board of Directors shall consist of the 
President and four other members, to he chosen at the an- 
nual meeting by ballot, two of whom shall represent the 

Eastern clubs and two the Western clubs. 

SEC. 17. In case of vacancy in the Board h\ reason of 
the death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any 
Director, the club of which he was a member, at the time 
he was chosen, shall designate his successor, and at once 
notify (he Secretary. Rut if such vacancy is caused by the 
withdrawal, disbanding, or disqualification of a club repre 

sented on the Board, the Board may till the vacancy by 

election in the same manner as provided for the election of 
Directors in Section 1 1 . 

Qualification of Directors. 
SEC. 18. No person shall be qualified to act as Director 

who is not an actual member of the club he represent 
nor shall any club under any circumstances, be represented 
by more than one person on the Hoard of Directors; nor 
shall any Director sit in the trial of a cause in which his 
club is interested. 

SEC. 19. The Hoard shall meet annually on the morning 

of the second Tuesday in December, at u o'clock i n, at 

the place where the annual meeting of the League is to be 
held, but may hold special meetings upon the call of the 

President or two members of the Board, whenever urgent 
necessity may require. 

SEC. 20. The Hoard shall prepare a detailed report of 
all their doings, and present the same in writing to the 



8 

League at its annual meeting; which report shall, if ac- 
cepted, be filed with the Secretary, together with all official 
papers, documents and property which may have come into 
their possession by virtue of their office. 

SEC. 21. The Board shall have a general supervision 
and management of all the affairs, and business of the 
League, including the award of the championship and such 
other duties expressedly or impliedly conferred upon them 
by this Constitution, or by legislation made in pursuance 
thereof. Jt shall be the sole and exclusive tribunal for 
the trial of managers or players for any violation of this 
Constitution or of the playing rules or other rules of <li^ 
cipline, unless the League by a three-fourths vote of its 
club membership, shall otherwise direct, h shall be the 
sole and exclusive tribunal to hear and determine disputes 
between clubs, complaints by a club against the manager 
or player of another club, or by a manager or player against 
his own club, or an appeal by a player against fine, suspen- 
sion or expulsion by his own club, or complaint by the 
President of the League against a club for failure to com- 
ply with Constitution requirements, and generally for the 
adjudication of all issues of law or fact arising out of this 
Constitution, the Playing Rules and other legislation made 
in pursuance thereof. 

SEC. 22. The Board shall adopt such regulations and 
such rules of procedure for the hearing and determination 
of all disputes and complaints brought before them. Where 
such dispute is in relation to a game alleged to have been 
played in violation of this Constitution or of the Playing 
Rules, the complaint and accompanying proofs mus1 be 
filed within five days after the date of said game with 
the President of the Board, who shall send a copy of the 
same to the Other clubs, with orders to file its answer within 
five days thereafter. The President of the Board shall in 
the first instance decide the dispute on its merits and forth- 
with communicate his decision to both clubs, either of which 
may within five days appeal from said decision to the full 
Board. Said decision, together with all other documents and 
proofs, shall thereupon be transmitted for a mail vote to the 
different members of the Board. The finding of the Board 
shall be final, and under no circumstances shall be recon- 
sidered, reopened or inquired into, either by the League or 
any subsequent Board. 

SEC. 23. The Board shall at once consider any com- 
plaint preferred by a club against a manager or pl.n 



another club (prior to the expiration of the championship 
season) for conduct in violation of any provision of this 
nniion. or prejudicial to the good repute of the game 
of base ball; and shall have power to require the club, to 
which such player or manager may belong, to discipline him. 
and upon repetition of such offense to expel him. Provided, 
that such complaint be preferred in writing, giving such 
particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all the 
facts, and such particulars shall be transmitted to the Sec- 
retary, by whom it shall at once be referred to the Board. 

SEC. 24. In case a player, under contract with a League 
club, shall, during a current season, prefer a complaint in 
writing to the Secretary of the League against such a 
club, alleging that such club is in arrears to him for sal- 
ary for more than fifteen days after such salary became due 
on account of such contract, the Secretary shall at once 
transmit to the said club a copy of such complaint, and re- 
quire an answer thereto. On receipt of such answer, or if 
five days shall have elapsed without receipt of an answer, 
the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the Board 
of Directors, and should the Hoard find the player's C0tE 
plaint sustained, they shall require the club, under penalty 
of forfeiture of iis membership, to pay to the player forth- 
with the full amount ascertained to be due him. Provided. 
that should the player refuse to serve the club pending ac- 
tion by the Board on his complaint, he will thereby forfeit ' 
the benefits of the award, and in such case the Board shall 
revoke his award. 

SEC. 25. The Board shall promptly hear an appeal made 
by any person who shall have been expelled, suspended or 
disciplined by his club, except in cases of expulsion as pro- 
vided in Section 38. Such person shall, within thirty days 
after the dale of the expulsion, suspension or discipline, 
file with the Secretary a written statement of his defense, 
accompanied by a request that an appeal be allowed him. 
The Secretary shall notify the club of the request for a 1 
appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy of the appeal ; 
and at the next meeting of the Board the club, by its duly 
authorized representative, and the appellant in person, 
by attorney or by written statement, shall appear before the 
Board with their testimony. The Board shall impartially 
hear the matter and render their decision, which shall be 
final and forever binding on both club and player. 

SEC. 26. Any player under contract or reservation who 
mav consider himself unjustly treated or wronged by his 



10 

club shall have the right to submit his case to the Presi- 
dent of the League, who shall, after soliciting evidence con- 
cerning the matter, present the same to the Board for hear- 
ing, recommendation or adjudication. The Board shall 
have authority to impose any just fine or pecuniary penalty 
on a club, a manager or a player, if warranted by linn 
findings and decisions, anil they may impose the expenses of 
trials and hearings on one or both parlies to the contro- 
versy. I'm such fine, penalty and expenses may be remitted 
by a three-fourths vole of the League upon appeal duly made 
and heard at an annual or special meeting. 



Individual Club Control. 
SEC. 27. Each club shall have the right to regulate its 
own affairs, to establish its own rules and to discipline, pun- 
ish, suspend or expel its own manager, players or other 
employes, and these powers shall not be limited to cas< - of 
dishonest play or open insubordination, but shall include 
all questions of carele sne . indifference or other conduct 
of the player that may be regarded by the club as prejudi- 
cial to its interest, and nol in conflict with any provision of 
this Constitution, or the Playing Rules of this League. 

Punishment of Scandalous Conduct. 
SEC. 28. The President of the League shall have power, 
upon proper proof, to suspend for a definite period and to 
impose a fine not exceeding $200 upon any League manager 
or player guilty, in public, of gross misbehavior, including 
intoxication, fighting, quarreling, indecency or other scandal 
ous conduct, whether on or off ihe playing field, during the 
in, where the same is, in liis opinion, calculated to bring 

disrepute upon the National League or National Game. 
Such fine can only be remitted by the Hoard of Directors 
alter a hearing upon appeal duly prosecuted. 

Club Territorial Rights. 
SEC. 29. Every club of this League shall have exclusive 
control of the oily in which it is located, and of the lerri 
tory surrounding such city, to the extent of five mile- in 
every direction from its corporate limits, and no visiting 
League club shall, under any circumstances, be allowed to 
play any club in such territory other than the League club 
therein located, without the consent of the local League 
club. 



11 

Reservation of Players. 
SEC. 30. Each club a member of this League shall be 
entitled to the right of reservation. On or before the 
zoth day of September in each year each club shall Irani 
mil to the Secretary a reserve list of the players whose 
services it desires to retain for the ensuing season, and 
who are then under contract to the said club for the 
current or for any succeeding season or seasons, ami in 
addition thereto the names of such players reserved in 
any prior annual list who have refused to contract with said 
club. Such players, together with all Others thereafter to 
be regularly contracted with, namely, players who have 
been secured by purchase or draft tinder the National 
Agreement for future services shall be ineligible to contract 
with any other club in this League except as hereinafter 
provided. No club shall have the right to reserve any 
player when in arrears of salary to him. The Secretary 
shall promulgate such lists on or before September 25th 
of each year. 

Negotiating for Services. 

SEC. 31. No player, without tin consent of the club 
with which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter 
into negotiations with any other club for future services. 



Contracts. 

SEC. 32. Contracts made between a club and its play- 
ers may be either by telegram or writing, to be followed 
within ten days thereafter by a contract ill the form ap 
proved and promulgated by the Secretary to all the clubs 
of the Leu 

SEC. 33. The League shall adopt such form of con- 
tract as it may deem best for the protection of the rights 
of the parties thereto. All contracts must be approved by 

the Secretary, ami duly promulgated by him. Whenever 

a club releases a player immediate notice must be given 
the President of the League, who shall at' once notify all 

clubs of such release, and for a period of ten days after 

such notice by the President, any other club of the League 
shall have the right io claim the prayer released and ne 
gotiatc for his services, and the player shall be ineligible 
io contract with a club of another League. Provided, 
however, that if a club desires to release a player for a 
consideration, and any other club of this League refuses to 



12 

waive claim, and the clubs interested cannot agree upon 
the terms for the release of the player, the matter should 
be arbitrated by the President of the League, and his de 
cision shall be final and binding upon all clubs in interest. 
All releases to be valid must be authorized by the Presi- 
dent of the releasing club. 

Suspension and Expulsion of Players. 

SEC. 34. Any player, while under contract with, or 
reservation by. a League club, who shall without the eon- 
sent of such club, enter the service of any other club in 
any capacity, shall be liable to expulsion by said League 
club. Whenever a club suspends or expels a manager or 
player, that club shall at once notify the Secretary of Ibis 
League, stating the date when the same takes effect, and in 
case of suspension or expulsion, the cause tin rent. 

SEC. 35. No manager or player, who has been sus- 
pended or expelled from a League club, shall at any time 
thereafter be allowed to play with, or serve in any ca- 
pacity, any League club (either the one expelling him or 
any other) unless the term of suspension by the club has 
expired, or upon his appeal to this League, such expulsion 
or suspension shall have been set aside. 

Effect of Club Disbandment. 

SEC. 36. '['he disbandment of a League club, or its 
withdrawal from or loss of League membership, shall 
operate as a release of its players from contract and reser- 
vation with said club, but the right to contract with and 
reserve said players shall revert to the League, and they 
shall be subject to transfer to such other ell "> as the 
League may designate after acceptance of their said ser- 
vices. 

Playing with Outside Clubs. 

SEC. 37. No game of base ball shall he played be- 
tween a League club and any other club that has been ex- 
pelled from membership in this League. No game of ball 
shall he played between a League club and any other club 
employing or ['.resenting in its nine a player expelled, or 
under suspension from the League, or otherwise ren- 
dered ineligible by this League or a did) member thereof. 

Crookedness and its Penalties. 
SEC. 38. Any person who shall be proven guilty of 
offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any 



13 

game of ball lo result otherwise than on its merits un- 
der the Playing Rule-., shall be forever disqualified by the 
President of the League from acting as umpire, manager, 
player or in any other capacity in any game of ball parti- 
cipated in by a League club. 



Umpires. 

SEC. 39. A staff of League umpires Shall be selected by 
tile Secretary before the opening of the regular seasoa 

i. Applicant for the position of umpire must stat« 
residence, experience, habits and such other qualifications 
as may be prescribed on forms prepared by the Secretary, 
which must have the endorsement of those who from skilled 
and personal knowledge can recommend the applicant for 
the position. 

Independent of such endorsements, however, the Secre- 
tary shall make inquiries and inform himself, as far as 
practicable, as to the merits and qualifications of each ap 
plicant. 

2. I hey shall lie paid such salaries and allowed 111 ii 
expenses as may be mutually agreed upon by contract be- 
tween them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the 
approval of the Board of Directors of the League. 

But at least ten per cent, of current salaries shall be with- 
held by the Secretary until the termination of his con- 
tract for that season to secure such deductions for absences 
and the payment of such lines as may he lawfully imp- 

3. In the event of the failure of an umpire to umpire 
a game assigned to him it -hall be the duly of the Secre- 
tary to provide a substitute to umpire such game; and in 
such ease there shall be deducted from the next payment to 
the umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game ,, 
signed to him. which for any re i rial! have failed 
to umpire. 

4. It shall be the duly of each League club to accept as 
umpire for any championship game such umpire 01 
stitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game. In the 
event of the non-appearance of the League umpire or sub 
stitute at the hour appointed for the beginning of the 
game eacli club captain shall then select one of the sub- 
stitute players of the opposing club, and the two players 
thus selected shall be the duly authorized umpires for that 
game. 

5. It shall be the duty of umpires to enforce the rules 



14 

;is they are written, regardless of personal opinion as to 
their merits, subject to th< Secretary's instructions as to 
their proper interpretation. They shall familiarize them- 
selves with these sections of the Constitution, obey all 

orders of the Secretary, assigning their services and wear 
such uniform on the playing field as he may designate. 

Supervision of Umpires. 

SEC. 40. All complaints against umpires shall be 
milted in writing or by telegraph to the President, who 
shall take such steps as he may deem proper (governed 
by the gravity of the charges) to ascertain as to the com 
petency of the umpire complained of and to verify, it' po 
sible, by his own persona] observation as to his merits or 
demerits. If the complaint he for a wilful violation of this 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules or for neglect or re- 
fusal to enforce any of said rules or for any improper or 
ungentlemanly language or conduct while officiating as an 
umpire, and if upon investigation it he substantiated, the 
President shall have the right to fine, remove, suspend 01 
expel the offender, as in his judgment the often i 
justify. 

Committees. 

SEC. 41. At each annual meeting of the League the 
President shall appoint a committee of three on Playing 
Rules, a committee of three on Schedule and a committee 
of three on Constitutional Amendments. 

The Championship. 

SEC. 42. The Championship of the United 
tahlished by this League, shall be contended for yearly 
by the clubs composing the League. 

SEC. 43. 'Hie championshi] shall extend from 

date in April or May to such date in September or 
October as the League may determine at its stated or spe- 
cial meeting. 

SEC. 44. Every game played between two clubs from 
the commencement of the championship season to the 
completion of the championship series between such clubs 
shall be a game for the championship, and no League club 
shall lend or exchange players to or with each other for 
any game played during the championship season. Any 
violation of this section shall subject each offender to a 
fine of $ioo. 

SEC. 45. Each club shall play twelve or more cham- 



15 

pionship games with every other club; hut a tie or draw 
game or a game prevented by rain or other causes shall 
be played off on the same ground on the next or a succeed 
ing date of the same or subsequent series, whether open or 
i heduJed for another game between the same clubs, thus 
compelling double games for said schedule date. If. how- 
ever, both series shall have terminated, such postponed 
game must he played off on the ground of the other club 
on a date open or scheduled during a subsequent series 
between the same clubs. 

SEC. 46. Each club shall have half of the champion- 
ship series of games with every other cluh played on its 
grounds, excep! as otherwise provided in Section 45; and 
in all the details of such games, that do not involve the 
rigiits of the visiting cluh under the Playing Rules, hut 
relate solely to such games as attractive exhibitions to the 
patrons of the home cluh, the visiting cluh shall defer to 
the wishes iif the home cluh; provided, nevertheless, that 
the home club shall not he permitted to change the usual 
hour for the commencement of scheduled games in its par 
ticular city more than thirty (30) minutes without first 
having obtained the consent of the visiting cluh thereto, 
under a penalty to the visiting cluh of $500. The visiting 
cluh shall furnish to a person designated by the home cluh 
the batting order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morning 
of the day of each game, or the evening previous, if re- 
quested. In case of the failure of any visiting cluh to fur- 
nish the hatting order of its nine as herein stipulated, it 
shall forfeit the sum of $10, which amount shall he im- 
mediately transmitted to the Secretary of the League, upon 
the receipt of notice from him of the infliction of such 
which notice shall he given by the Secretary upon 
receipt of complaint from the home cluh. 

It shall he the duty of the home cluh to furnish the 
manager and captain of the visiting cluh with a list of 
the hatting order before the commencement of the game 
under similar penalties for default as herein prescribed. 
The visiting cluh shall have the right to practise its nine 
on the grounds of the home cluh between 11 and 12 o'clock 
A. M. on each day of its visit during the championship 
season. 

The Championship Schedule. 

SEC. 47. All championship games shall he arranged in 
a written schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, 



16 






and reported to and adopted by the League by a three- 
fourths vote before the beginning of the championship sea- 
son. The schedule shall provide for an equal number of 
return games, and shall specify the date of each game and 
the date of each series of games. No date in said schedule 
shall subsequently be changed, except (i) by written 
agreement of two clubs from a date fixed by the schedule 
for a game between such clubs to an open date on the same 
ground; or (2) as provided in Section 45; or (3) by the 
written consent of three-fourths of all the League clubs. 

Any club or clubs violating this section shall be amen 
able to a penalty of $1,000. Said penalty to be paid with 
in forty-eight hours to the Treasurer of the League, or 
if not so paid to be withheld from any funds to their 
credit in the hands of the Treasurer. All games played in 
violation of this section shall not count in the champion- 
ship series. 

The Admission Fees and Receipts. 

SEC. 48. ,The general admission fee to all champion- 
ship games shall be fifty (50) cents, but each club shall 
designate a part of its grounds, and provide seats thereon, 
the admission fee to which shall be twenty-five (25) cents, 
and all division of percentages shall be made on the basis 
of fifty (50) cents, except as to that part of the grounds 
the admission fee to which is fixed at twenty-five ( 25 I 
cents, and as to such part of said grounds all divisions of 
percentage shall be on the basis of twenty-five (25) cents. 

At the conclusion of each championship game the home 
club shall deliver to tin: manager of the visiting club (and 
shall transmit by mail to the President or other designated 
officials of the visiting club a duplicate of the same) a 
statement of the receipts of said game, which must in- 
clude all fifty-cent and twenty-five cent admissions, and 
shall pay 0. the visiting club fifty per centum of said re- 
ceipts. 

The Ball Park. 

SEC. 49. Each park shall be provided with a sufficient 
number of exits and entrances (not exceeding four) for 
the accommodation of the public, and a separate entrance 
shall lie maintained for the convenience of the press rep 
itatives and those entitled to the courtesies of the 
grounds. 

I. Additional entrances may be opened upon holidays, 
but for such days the visiting club shall be given at least 



17 

ten days' notice of the whole number and their location. 
2. Emergency gates may be opened at any time by con- 
sent of the visiting club, if occasion requires. 

The Turnstile Count. 
SEC. 50. The number of persons admitted to the 
grounds shall be determined by the use of the necessary 

number of self-registering turnstiles, the arms of which 
shall extend within four inches of a dividing partition, the 
keys of which shall be delivered to the agent of the visit 
ing club before the opening of the grounds for each game; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have full access 
to such turnstile, and the box of such turnstile shall not be 
removed until after the close of the seventh inning, and in 
case a carriage gate is used a ticket for each person ad- 
mitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to the 
agent of the visiting club. The visiting club shall have 
the right to accept the turnstile count for each and all 
games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be ■ 
quired to use for its business substantial pasteboard ticket 
which can be readily counted. 

Special Entrance. 
SEC. 51. No person shall be admitted free to a cham- 
pionship game, except players and officers of contesting 
clubs, umpires, policemen in uniform, necessary employes 
of the home club, representatives of the press and such 

invited guests as the _ 1'rcsident of the home club may 
deem proper to recognize, all of whom must pass through 
a self-registering turnstile at the special entrance provided 
for the press, and said turnstile shall be subject I 
same right of inspection by the visiting club thai is pro- 
vided in all other entrances. 

i. It shall be the duty of the President of the League to 
inspect all ball parks from time to time, and to report to 
the Board of Directors any failure to comply with this 
or any other section of the Constitution. 

Stopping Play to Catch Trains. 
SEC. 52. On any day when either club is required to 
leave a city to, or in order to reach another city in time, 
where it is scheduled to play its next game, the home club 
shall be compelled, upon proper notice by the visiting 
club, to begin the game three hours and a half before tin 
time of the departure of the last train by means of which 



18 

either club can reach next scheduled point in time. And 
either club may leave the field at an}- time within one hour 
of said train time without forfeiting any rights or privi- 
leges, provided five innings on each side have been played, 
and the umpire shall be the sole judge of the time. 

Giving out Admission Checks. 

SEC. 53. In the event of a game being Stopped by rain 
or declared forfeited before completion of five innings, the 
home club may issue admission checks good for the next 
succeeding game. If such checks are so issued, the visit 
ing club shall not be entitled to its percentage of receipts; 

but if such checks are not issued the visiting club shall 
be entitled to its percentage of receipts, precisely as if the 
game had been fully played. 

Forfeited Games. 
SEC. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games— 
to count in its series as games won by a score of nine 

runs tn none — in case ivhe e the umpire in any champion- 
ship game shall award I lie game to such club on account 
of the violation by the contesting club of any section of 
this Constitution or of any playing rules. In the evenl oi a 
forfeiture for tmy reason, the forfeiting club shall incur 
such penally not exceeding one thousand dollars as may be 
imposed by the Board of Directors after a hearing held 
within one week from the date of such game, and any 
damages suffered by the non-offending club shall be paid 
out of such penalty. In addition to the penalty above re- 
ferred to. the captain or manager, or the person in charge 
of the offending team and responsible for the team leav- 
ing the held, shall incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
which shall be paid within five days to the Secretary i 
League, said penalty not to be remitted under tiny circum- 
stances. In case such pcnalt b are not paid within trii 
days after being imposed, the club and player cannot par- 
ticipate in a champi. .me. 

Drawn Games. 
SEC. 55. Drawn, tie ami postponed games shall ti"l 
conn] in the series as games (but any game of not less than 
five innings shall be included in the averages), but must 

be played off, if po provided in Section 45. If 

they cannot be played off, as therein provided, they may 



. 19 

subsequently be played off, if sufficient time exists before 
the close of the season. 

Double games for one admission shall not be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such or rendered compul- 
sory by the playing off of postponed games, as provided in 

Section 45. 

Winning the Pennant. 
SEC. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest 
percentage of games in the championship series, shall be 

declared the champion club of the United States, for the 
11 in which such games were played. In the even! 
that two or more clubs shall have won the same per- 
centage of games, then the Board shall at once arrange a 
Special series of three games between any two of such 
clubs, such games to lie played at I he close of the cham- 
pionship season, and the games so played shall be included 
in the championship record, and counted in determining 
the award of (lie championship. In such case only the pro 

visions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 
cording as championship games, games played after the ex 
ptration of the championship season, shall have no effect. 
'I'he emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of 
the National colors) to cosi nol less than one hundred 
dollars C$100). It shall be inscribed with the motto. 
"Champion Base Ball Club of the United States," with the 
name of the club and the year in which the title was won, 
and the champion club shall be entitled to fly the pennant 
until iIh' e]ns C <if tin- ensuing year. 

Deciding the Championship. 
SEC. 57. The championship shall be decided in the 
following manner: Within twenty-four hours after 1 
match game played for the championship, the home club 
shall prepare and forward to the Secretary of the League 
a statement containing the full scon- of the game, accord 
ing to the system specified in the flaying Rule 
with the date, the place where played, the name of the 
clubs and umpire, provided that no tie or drawn game shall 
be considered a game for any purpose except the aver 
and provided, further, that in any case where the 
Secretary shall not receive the score of a champion-hip 
game within five days after the playing of such game, the 
club whose duty it is to forward such score shall pj 
the League the sum of $_> as the penalty of such default. 



20 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare 
a tabular statement of the games won and lost by each 
club, according to the statement so sent him. which state- 
ment shall lie the sole evidence in the matter, and sub- 
mit the same, with the statement so sent him, to the Board, 
which shall make the award in writing, and report the 
same to the League at its annual meeting. 

In making l he award the Board shall consider: 

1. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. Games participated in by clubs which have with 
drawn, disbanded or forfeited their membership without 
completing their championship series with all other League 
dubs, such games shall he counted 10 the following extent : 

The Board shall ascertain the least number of cham- 
pionship games played by such club with any club remain- 
ing in the League, and shall from the first game partici- 
pated in during the championship series by such retired 
club, count in the series of each League club a similar 
number of and all other games participated in by 

such retired club shall not he counted in the championship 
series. Provided, that if such retired club shall have 
failed to play tit least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
out entirely. 

Meetings. 

SEC. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be 
held on the second Tuesday in December of each year, 
at 2 o'clock P. M., and at such places as shall have been 
determined by a vote at the previous annual meeting. 

SEC. 59. Special meetings may be called by the Presi- 
dent of this League on his own option or on the written 
call of six clubs. 



Club Representation. 
SEC. 60. At such meeting each club shall be reprc- 
1 and shall he entitled to two representatives, and 
to have in addition thereto any of its officers or ex-officers 
present at such meetings: but "no club shall be permitted to 
send as a representative any person under contract or 
engagement as a ball player or manager, and belonging to 
'If tittle of said club in such capacity. They shall, if re- 
quested by any other club representative, present a certi- 



21 

fiatle of their appointment duly attested by ;u least two 
officers of their club showing their authority to act. hut no 
club shall have more than one vote. 

Executive Session. 
SEC. 61. This League may, upon a majority vote of its 
members, elect to go into executive session for the trans- 
action of its business, and during such session no club 
shall be entitled to more than two representatives. 

Quorum. 
SEC. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
less number may adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
is obtained. When obtained it may be maintained by lock- 
ing the doors of the meeting room, the appointment of 
doorkeepers and such oth dures usual in parliamen- 

tary bodies to maintain quorums and dispatch business. 

Order of Business. 

SEC. 63. The following shall be the order of business 
unless suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club mem- 
bers : 

r. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

_>. Report of Board of Directors. 

.V Report of Commit i< 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 
(1. Adoption of Playing Rules. 
7. Election of officers. 

X. Miscellaneou business. 
9. Adjournment. 



Amendments. 
SEC. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be 
d or amended by a three-fourths vote of the League 
at any annual meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any 
other time. Provided, however, that this section and Sec- 
tions ,3, 8, 9, 38, 48 shall not be altered or amended r\ 
eept by a unanimous vote of this League. (2) Any 
tion of this Constitution may be suspended or its provis 
ion made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
I ing. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 



»8 



*J1 





'■o 



Enlarged Section Showing <5 

Home Base. 




23 



The Official Playing Rules 

OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS 



As adopted at the meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Committee of the 

National League and the American League, held at National 

League Headquarters, New York City, March 2, 1904. 



The Ball Ground. 

The ball ground must be enclosed and 
RULE 1. sufficient in size to permit the players of 
the team no! at bat to be stationed al the 
positions respectively assigned to them by their captain. 
To obviate the necessity for ground rules, the shortest 
i distance from a fence or stand on fair territory to the 
home base should be 235 feet and from home base to the 
grandstand. 90 feet. 



To Lay Off the Field. 

To lay nil I he lines defining the location 
RULE 2. of the several bases, the catcher's and the 
pitcher's position and establishing the boun- 
daries required in playing the game <>f base ball, proceed as 
follow 9 : 

Diamond or Infield. 

From a point. A. within the grounds, project a straight 
hue OUt into the held, and al a point, B, 154 feet from point 
A. lay off lines B C and B [) at right angles to the line 
A B; then, with I', as a center and 63.63945 feel as a radius, 
describe arcs cutting the lines B A at F and B C at G, 15 I) 
al II and B E at I. Draw lines F G. G E, E II. and 1! F, 
which said lines shall be the containing lines of the Dia- 
mond or Infield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 

With I'" as a center and 10 feet radius, de- 

RULE 3. scribe an arc cutting line FA at L, and 

draw lines I. M ami 1. at right angles 

to F A. and continue same out from F A not less than 

10 feet. 



24 

The Foul Lines. 

From the intersection point, F, continue 

R*ULE 4. the straighl lines I" G and F II until they 

intersect the lines 1. M and L O, and then 

from the points G and H in the opposite direction until 
liny reach the boundary lines of the ground 

The Players' Lines. 
With F as center and 50 foot radius, 
RULE 5. describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet raditts. describe arcs cutting F G and F 11 at 
R and S: then, from the points P, Q. R and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F O, F M, F G and F H. and 
continue the same until they intersect at the points T 
and \V. 

The Coacher's Lines. 

With R ami S as centers and 15 feel 

RULE 6. radius, describe arcs cutting the lines R W 

and ST at X and Y and from the points 

X and Y draw lines parallel with the lines F H and F G, 

and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground. 

The Three-Foot Line. 

With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
RULE 7. describe an arc cutting the line F G at 1, and 
from 1 to the distance of three feet draw a 
line at right angles to F G, and marked point 2; then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a point 
three feel beyond 'the point G, marked 3; then from the 
point 3 draw a line ai right angles to line 2. 3, back to 

and intersecting with F G, and from thence back along 
line G F to point 1. 

The Batsman's Lines. 

On either side of the line A F B de- 

RULE 8. scribe two parallelograms six feet long anil 

four feet wide (marked 8 and 9), their 

ide being parallel with the line A F B, their 

nee apart being six incite- added to each end of the 

length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F, 

and the center of their length being on said diagonal. 



25 

The Pitcher's Plate. 
SECTION i. With point F as center and 
RULE 9. 60.5 feel as radius, describe an are cutting 
the line F H at line 4, and draw a line 5', 0, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 incites on either 
side of line FB; then with line 5. (>. as a side, describe a 
parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches, in which shall he lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 2. The pitcher's plate shall not he more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the home plate, which 
shall he level with the surface of the field, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate to every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual. 



The Bases. 
Section 1. Within the angle F. describe 

RULE 10. a five-sided figure, two of the sides "I which 

shall coincide with the lines F G and F II 
to the extent of 12 inches each, thence parallel with the 
line F B <-!'.■ inches to the points X and V. a straight line 
between which. 17 inches, will form the front of the home 
base or plate. 

Sec 2. Within the tingles at G, I and II describe 

squares, whose sides arc 15 inches in length, two of such 

of which squares shall lie along the lines F (I and 

(1 I. (i I and 1 II. I II and II !•'. which squares shall be 

the location of the first, second and third liases respectively. 

The Home Base ii F and tin- 1'itcher's 
RULE 11. Plate at 4 must each he of whitened rubber, 

and so lived in the ground as to he even 
with its surface. 

The First Base at (i. the Second Base 

RULE 12. at E, and the Third I'.ase at II must each 

he a white canvas hag tilled with sofl ma- 
terial and securely fastened in place at the point specified 
for it in Rule io. 



The lines d< ;;i Rules 3, 4. 5. 0, - t 

RULE 13. and S must he marked with lime, chalk Or 

other white material, easily distinguishable 

from the ground or glass. 



26 

The Ball. 
SECTION t. The ball must weigh not less 
RULE 14. than five nor more than five and one-quar- 
ter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches 
in circumference. The Spalding National League Rail or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used in all 
games played under these rules. 

Sec. 2. Two regulation halls of the make adopted by 
the league of which the contesting clubs are members, 
shall be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 
before the hour for the commencement of a championship 
game. If the ball first placed in play be batted or thrown 
out of the grounds or into one of the stands for spectators 
or in the judgment of the umpire, become unfit for play 
from any cause, the umpire shall at once deliver the alter- 
nate ball to the pitcher and another legal ball shall be sup- 
plied to him. so that he shall at all times have in his con- 
trol one or more alternate balls to substitute for the ball 
in play in any of the contingencies above set forth. Pro- 
vided, however, that all balls batted or thrown out of the 
ground or into a stand, shall when returned to the field 
be given into the custody of the umpire immediately and 
become alternate balls and so long as he has in bis posses- 
sion two or more alternate balls, he shall not call for a new- 
ball to replace a ball that has gone out of play. The alter- 
nate balls shall become the ball in play in the order in 
which they were delivered to the umpire. 

Sec. 3. Immediately upon the delivery to him of the 
alternate ball by the umpire, the pitcher shall take his posi- 
tion and on the call of "Play," by the umpire, it shall be- 
come the ball in play. Provided, however, that play shall 
tun be resumed with the alternate ball when a fair batted 
ball or a ball thrown by a fielder goes out of the ground 
or into a stand for spectators until the base-runners have 
completed the circuit of the bases unless compelled to stop 
at second or third base in compliance with a ground 
rule. 



The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the past twenty-seven years and readopted in 1902 for five years, and 
is usc«i in all League contests. 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under 16 years of age) we 
recommend them to use the Spalding Boy's League Ball, and that games 
played by junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same 
as if played with the Official League Ball. 



27 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 

Sec. 4. The ball in play shall not be intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise damaged. 
In the event of a new ball being intentionally discolored, 
or damaged by a player, the umpire shall upon appeal by 
the captain of the opposite side, forthwith demand the 
return of that ball and substitute for it another legal ball, 
as hereinbefore described, and impose a tine of $5.00 on the 
offending player. 



Home Club to Provide Balls. 
Sec. 5- In every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the last in play shall 
become the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 
be enclosed in a paper box, sealed with the seal of the 
Secretary of the League and hearing his certificate that he 
has examined, measured and weighed it and that it is of 
the required standard in all respects. The seal shall not 
be broken by the umpire except in the presence of the 
captains of the contesting teams after "Play" has been 
called. 

Reserve Balls on Field. 

Sec. 6. The home club shall have at least a dozen reg- 
ulation halls on the field during each championship game, 
ready fur use on the call of the umpire. 

Unfit Ball for Play. 

Sec. 7. Should the hall become ripped or in any way 
damaged SO as to be. in the opinion of the umpire, unlit 
fur use, he shall, upon appeal by cither captain, at once 
call fur a new ball and put tin- alternate ball into play. 



The Bat. 

The bat must be round, not over two and 
RULE 15. three-fourth inches in diameter at the thick- 
est part, nor more than -)_' inches in length 
and entirely of hardwood, except that for a distance of 
r8 inches from the end. twine may be wound around or 
a granulated substance applied to the handle. 



28 



RULE 16, 



ta-.n 
allowed 



Number of Players in a Game. 

The players of each club, actively en- 
gaged in a game at one time, shall he muc- 
in number, one of whom shall ad as cap 

and in no case shall more or less than nine men he 
play on a side in a game. 



Positions of the Players. 

The players may lie stationed at any point 
RULE 17. of the field their captain may elect, regard- 
of their respective positions, except 
that the pitcher, while in the act of delivering the ball to 
the bat, must take his position as defined in Rules g and 
30; and the catcher must be within the lines of his position 
as defined in Rule 3 and within 10 feet of home base, when - 
ever the pitcher delivers the ball to the bat. 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

Players in uniform shall not be pcrmit- 
RULE 18. ltd to occupy seats in the stands, or to 
mingle with the spectators. 

Uniforms of Players. 

Every club shall adopt two uniforms for 
RULE 19. its players, one to be worn in games at 
home and the other in games abroad, and 
the suits of each of the uniforms of a team shall conform 
in color and style. No player who -hall attach anything 
to the sole or heel of his shoe other than the- ordinary base 
ball shoe plate, or who shall appear in a uniform not con- 
forming to the suits of the other members of his team, 
shall be permitted to lake part in a game. 

Size and Weight of Gloves. 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a 
RULE 20. glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight. 
Every other player is restricted to tin- use 
of a glove or mitt weighing not over to ounces and m 
uring not over 14 inches around the palm. 

Players' Benches. 

Section i. Players' benches must befor- 
RULE 21. nished by the home club and placed upon 
a portion of tin- ground not less than twen- 
ty-five C23) feet outside of the players' lines. One such 



29 

bench shall lie for the exclusive use of the visiting team 
and the other for the exclusive use of . the home team. 
Each bench must he covered with a roof and closed at the 

hark and each end; a space, however, not more than six 
(6) inches wide may he left under the roof for ventilation. 
All players and substitutes of the side at hat must be 
sealed on their team's bench, except the batsman, basi 
runners and such as are legally assigned to coach base- 
runners. Under no circumstances shall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
and the manager of the team entitled to its exclusive use 
to he seated on a bench. 



Penalty for Violation. 

Sec. 2. To enforce this rule the captain of the other 
side may call the attention of the umpire to its violation 
by his opponents, whereupon the umpire shall immediately 
order such player or players as have disregarded it to he 
seated. If the order he not obeyed within one minute the 
offending player or players shall he lined $5.00 each by the 
umpire. If the order he not then obeyed within one minute, 
the offending player or players shall he debarred from 
further participation in the game, and shall he obliged to 
forthwith leave the playing field. 

A Regulation Game. 

Every championship game must he com 
RULE 22. mer.ced not later than two hours before 
sunset and shall continue until each team 
has had nine innings, provided, however, that the game 

shall terminate 1 

(1) If the side first at hat scores less runs in nine innings 
than the oilier side has Scored in eight inning-. 

( _' ) If the side lasl at hat in the ninth inning scored the 
winning run before the third man is out. 

Extra-Inning Games. 

It the score he a tie at the end of nine 
RULE 23. (<j) innings for each team, play shrill he 

continued until one side has scored more 
runs than the other in an e |ual number of innings, pro- 
vided, that if the side last at hal score the winning run 
before the third man is out in any inning after the ninth, 
the game shall terminate. 



30 

Drawn Games. 
A drawn game shall be declared by the 

RULE 24. umpire ii tl equal on the last 

even inning played when he terminates 
play on account of darkness, rain, fire, panic, or for other 
cause which puts patrons or players in peril, after five or 
more equal innings have been played by each team. Bui 

if the side thai wen i i-. at the hat when the 

game is terminated, and has -cored the same number of 
runs as the other side, the umpire shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the -core of the last equal inning. 



RULE 25. 



Called Games. 
Tf the umpire call "Game" on account 
of darkness, rain. fire, panic, or other i 
which put- patrons or players in peril, at 
any time after live inning- have been completed, the 

shall he that of the last equal innings played, hut il 

d ,u hat -hall have scored in an unequal number 

of iiniiug-. or befi of the unfinished 

inning, one or more runs than the side firs) at hat, the 

hall he the total number of runs each 

team has made. 



Forfeited Games. 

' A forfeited game shall he declared by the 

KULE 26. umpire in favor of the club not in fault, at 

the request of such club, in the following 

f'llX I. If t|,e ,,.;„„ (j f g gjyjj n ,] R . 

Held or being upon the field, ret- ni a gal. 

which it is scheduled or assigned, within five minu 

d "1'lay" at the hour for the beginning 
Ol 'lie game, ui h d e l a y n, appearing, or in 

mencing tb 1.1,1,. 

-i-.<- -'. If. after the game ha- begun, on. 

continue to p] ;! , h , ,, :M|| pended or 

terminated by the ompii 

X If. after play i ■ umpire, 

"•',* ,:i11 '' playing in one minute after the 

umpire has calli 

4- If a tear alpably d< iigned to 

delay the game. 



31 



of the 



Sec. 5. If. after warning by the umpire, any 01 
rales of the game be wilfully and p 

,, F 0r the removal a player, as au- 
ed by Rules 21, 58 and 64, be nol obeyed within 

miiu:. , 

Sec. ; If because -1' the removal oi players mm tin- 
game by the umpire, or for am, cause, there t» l< tnan 
nine players 0:1 either tram. . . 

Sec. 8. If. when two e scheduled to be playea 

in one afternoon, the second game be not commenced 
within ton minutes of the time <>f the completion of tic 
first game. The umpire of the first game shall be the 
timekeeper. 

Sei . 'i. h, cas< trt e umpin declare 
he hall transmit a written report thereof to tin- president 

four hours thereafter. How- 
ever, a failure on ti„ part 'of the umpire to -o notify the 
dent shall not affect tin- validity of his award of the 
game by forfeit 

No Game. 

"No game" declared by tin mn 

ULE 27 - pire if he terminates flay on account of 

rain or darkness, tin. panic, or any other 

cause which puts the patrons or players in peril before five 

innings are completed 1- Pro ided, however, 

that if the clnh second at hat shall have made more rims 
at the end of its fourth inning than the clnh first at hat 
™ade in five completed innings of a game so ter- 
minated, the umpire shall award >he game to the club bav- 
c number of runs, and it shall count as 
a legal game in ihe championship record. 

Substitutes. 
Section i. Each side shall he required 

RULE 28. to h held during a chain 

pionship garni ient number 1 >■ 

StltUte players in uniform, conforming to the suit- worn 
heir team-mates, t,, carry out thi ' this 

an nine players shall 
he field in any inning ami-. 

Sec. 2. Any such substitute may at air. ' the 

game take the 1 a player whose name is in his 

• ram's batting order, hut the player whom he succeeds 

shall not thereafter participate in that game. 



32 

Sec ,v A base-runner shall not have another player 
whose name appears in the batting order of his team run 
for him except by the consent of the captain of the other 
team. 

Choice of Innings — Fitness of Field for Play. 

The choice of innings shall be given to 
RULE 29. the captain of the home club, who shall be 
the sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for beginning a game after a rain: but. after play has been 
called by the umpire, he alone shall be the judge as to the 
fitness of the ground for resuming play after the game has 
been suspended fin account of rain. 



THE PITCHING RULES. 
Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in front 
of the pitcher's plate; and in the act of delivering the ball 
to the bat he must keep one foot in contact with the 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule 9. lie shall not raise either 
foot until in the act ,,! delivering the ball to the bat, nor 
make more than one step in such delivery. 

A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A fairly delivered ball is a. ball pitched 
RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
■ ling in his position and facing the bats- 
man that passes over any portion of the home base, ii"> 
lower than the batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoul- 
der, for every such fairly delivered ball the umpire shall 
call on.- strike. 



An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 

An unfairly delivered ball is a ball de- 
RULE 32. livered to die bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that does not pass over any portion of the home base 
between the batsman's shoulder and knee. For every un- 
fairly delivered ball the umpire shall call one ball. 



33 

Delaying the Game. 

Section i. If, after the batsman be 
RULE 33. standing in liis proper position ready to 
strike at a pitched ball, the ball he thrown 
by the pitcher to any player other than the catcher when 
in the catcher's lines and within to feel of the home base 
(except in an attempt to retire a base runner), each hall 
so thrown shall be called a hall. 

Sec. 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the ball to 
the batsman for a longer period than 20 seconds, excepting 
that at the commencement of each inning, or when a pitch- 
er relieves another, the pitcher may occupy one minute in 
delivering not to exceed live balls to the catcher or an 
infielder, during which time play shall be suspended. 



Balking. 

A balk shall be: 
RULE 34. Section i. Any motion made by the 
pitcher while in position {<> deliver the ball 
i" the l>at without delivering it. or to throw to first base 
when occupied by a base runner without completing the 
throw. 

Sec. 2. Throwing the ball by the pitcher to any base to 
catch the base runner without stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making such throw. 

Sec. 3. Any delivery of the ball to the bal by the pitcher 
while either foot is hack of the pitcher's plate. 

SEC. 4, Any delivery of the hall to the bat by the pitch- 
er while he is not facing the batsman. 

Sec. 5. Any motion in delivering the hall to the bat by 
the pitcher while not in the position denned by Rule 30. 

SEC 6. Holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, in 
the opinion of the umpire. In unnecessarily delay the game. 

Sec. 7. Making any motion to pitch while standing in his 
position without having the ball in his possession. 

Sec. 8. Making any motion of the arm, shoulder, hip nr 
body the pitcher habitually makes in his method of delivery, 
without immediately delivering the ball to tin- bal. 

SEC 0. Delivery of the ball to the bat when the catcher 
is standing outside the lines of tin- catcher's position as 
defined in Rule 3. 

If the pitcher shall fail to comply with the requirements 
of any Section of this rule, the umpire shall call a "balk." 



'r 



34 

Dead Ball. 

A dead ball is a ball delivered to the bal 
RULE 35. by the pitcher, not struck at by the bats- 
man, that touches any pari of the bats- 
man's person or clothing while standing in his position, 
or that before passing or getting beyond the control of the 
catcher touches any part of the clothing or person of the 
umpire while he is on foul ground. 

Ball Not in Play. 

In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not 
RULE 36. legally caught, dead ball, or a fair hit ball 

tombing a base runner, the ball shall not 
be considered in play until it be held by the pitcher stand 
tng in his position, and the umpire shall have called 
"Play." 

Block Balls. 
Section i. A block is a batted or thrown 
RULE 37. ball that is touched. Stopped or handled 

by a person not engaged in the game. 
Sec. 2. Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall de- 
clare il, and base runners may run the bases without 
liability to be put out until the ball has been returned to 
and held by the pitcher in his position. 

Sec. 3. If the person not engaged in the game should 
retain possession of a blocked ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire shall call 
"'lime" and require each base runner to stop at the base 
last touched by him until the ball be returned 10 the pitcher 
in his position and the umpire shall have called "Play." 

THE BATTING RULES. 
The Batsman's Position. 

Each player of the side at bat shall be- 

RULE 38. come the batsman and must take hi- po 

tion within the batsman's lines (as defined 
in Ride 8) in the order that his name appears in his team's 
batting list. 

The Order of Batting. 

The batting order of each ham musl 1" 
RULE 39. delivered before the game by its captain lo 

the umpire who shall submit it to the in- 
spection of the captain of the other side. The batting order 



35 

delivered Lo the umpire must be followed throughout the 
game unless ;i player be substituted for another, in which 
■ the substitute must take the place in the batting order 
of the retired player. 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

A her the first inning the first striker in 
RULE 40. each inning shall be the batsman whose 

name follows llial of the last man who 
completed liis "time at bat" in the preceding inning. 

Players Belong on Bench. 
When a side gnes to the bat its players 
RULE 41. must immediately seat themselves on the 
bench assigned to them as defined in Rule 
21, and remain there until their side is put out, e 
when called t') the bat or to act as coachers or substitute 
base runners. 

Reserved for Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

Ho player of the side "at hat," except the 

RULE 42. batsman, shall occupy any portion of the 

space within the catcher's lines as defined 

in Rule 3. The triangular space hack of the home base is 

reserved for the exclusive use of the umpire, catcher and 
batsman, and the umpire musl prohibit any player of th< 

side "at hat" from crossing tin- --ami- at any time while the 
hall is in the hands of the pitcher or catcher or passing 
between them while standing in their positions. 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The players of the side at hat must 
RULE 43. speedily abandon their bench and hi 

to am 't In)- pari of the field w lien by remain 
nig upon or near it they or any of them would interfere 
with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thrown 
hall. 



THE BATTING RULES. 
A Fair Hit. 

A fair hit is a legally hatted hall that 

RULE 44. settles on fair ground between home and 

first baae or between home and third 

base or that is on fair ground when hounding to the out- 



36 

field past firsl or third ba e or thai first falls on f;iir terri- 
tory beyond firsl or third base or thai touches the person 
of the umpire nr a player while on fair ground, 



A Foul Hit. 
A foul hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 45. settles on foul territory between home and 
first base or home and third base, or that 
bounds past first or third base on foul territory or that 
falls on foul territory beyond first or third base or tou 
the person of the umpire or a player while on foul ground. 

A Foul Tip. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the 
RULE 46. man while standing within the lines of his 
position, that goes sharp and direct from 
the bat to the catcher's hands and i- legally caught. 



A Bunt Hit. 

A bunt hit i- a legally baited ball, not 

RULE 47. swung at, but met with the bat and tapped 

slowly within the infield by the batsman 

with the expectation of reaching first base before the ball 
can be fielded to that base. If the attempt to bunt n 

in a foul, a Mrike shall be called by the umpire. 



Balls Batted Outside the Ground. 

R . SecTIOM I. When a halted ball passes 

mule 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
pire shall decide it fair or fold according to 

whether the point at which it leave- the playing field i- 

on fair or foul territory. 

-'■ A fair batted ball that goes over the feu. ■ 
Stand hall entitle the batsman 10 a home run HI 

it should pass out of the ground or into a stand at a 

"stance than two hundred and thirty-five <-Ms> feet from 
He home base, in which case the batsman -ball be entitled 
to two bases only. The point at which a fence or stand 
i- less than 2.15 feet fro,,, the home base -hall be plainly 
indicated by a while or black sign or mark for the um- 
pire s guidance. 



37 

Strikes. 

A strike is: 

rule 49. Section i. A pitched ball struck at by 

the batsman withoul its touching his bat; or, 

Sec. 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher at 

which the batsman does not strike. 

Sec. 3. A foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the 

batsman lias two strikes. 

Sec. 4. An attempt to bunt which results in a foul. 

Sec. 5. A pitched ball, at which the batsman strikes but 
misses and which touches any part of his per.--' mi. 

Sec 6. A foul tip, held by the catcher, while stand- 
ing within the lines of bis position. 



Foul Strike. 

A "Foul Strike" is a ball batted by the 
RULE 50. batsman when either or both of his feet is 

upon the ground outside the lines of the 
batsman's position, 

When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman i- out : 
RULE 51. Section i. If he fail to take his position 

at the bat in the order in which his name 

is "ii the baiting list unless the error be discovered and 
the proper batsman replace him before a time "at bat" is 
recorded, in which case, the balls and strikes called must 
be counted in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper batsman shall be declared out, and 
no runs shall be scored or bases run because of any act 
of the improper batsman. Provided, this rule shall not be 
enforced unless the out be declared before the ball be de 

liver, (I to the succeeding batsman. Should the batsman 
declared oiil under this section be the third hand out and 
his side be thereby put out. the proper batsman in the next 
inning shall be the player who would have come to bat 
had the players been put out by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

SEC 2. If be fail to take bis position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 

SEC ,1. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip, as 
defined in Rule 46, ami the ball he momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching the ground: provided, it be not 
caught in a fielder's cap, protector, pocket or other part of 






38 

his uniform, or strike some object other than a fielder be- 
fore being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he make a foul strike, as defined ill Rule 50 

Sec. 5. If he attempt i<> hinder the catcher from fielding 
OT throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the 
batsman's position, or in any way obstructing or interfer 
ing with that player. 

SEC. 6. If. while first base be occupied by a base runner, 
three strikes he called on him by the umpire, unless two 
men are alread] 

Sec 7. It. while attempting a third strike, the ball 
touch any pari of the batsman's person, in which case base 
runners occupying bases shall not advance as prescribed 

in Rule 55. Section 5. 

Sec K. If, bi bands are out, while first and 

second or first, second and third bases are occupied, he 
hit a fly hall, other than a line drive, that can he handled 
by an infielder. In such case the umpire shall, as soon as 
the hall be hit, declare it an infield or outfield hit. 

Sec i). If the third strike he called in accordance with 
Rule 49, Section 5. 

Batsman Must Obey Call. 
Sec. 10. The moment a batsman's term at hat ends, the 
umpire shall call for the batsman next in order to leave 
his seat on the bench and take his position at the hat. and 
no player of (he batting side shall leave his seat on the 
' until so called to hat. except to become a coachcr 
or substitute base runner, to take the place of a player 
on bis team'., hatting list, to comply with the umpire's 
order to leave the field 01 to make way for a fielder. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 
Legal Order of Bases. 

The Base Runner must touch each 
in legal order, viz., hirst. Second. Third 
and 1 lases; and when obliged to re- 

turn while the ball is in play, 11111-t retouch thl 

■ order. He can only acquire the right to a 

iy touching it. before having been pot out, and shall 
then he entitled to bold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or ha- lly forced 

to vacate u for a succeeding base runner. However, no 
base runner shall score a run to count in the gam.- ahead 



RULE 52. 



39 

<>f the base runner preceding liim in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
out in that inning. 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 
The batsman becomes a base runner: 
RULE 53. SECTION i. Instantly after he makes a 

fair hit. 
Sec _'. Instantly after "Four Balls" have been called by 
the umpire. 

Sec. ,;. Instantly after "Three Strikes" have been de- 
clared by the umpire. 

Sec 4. if, without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unless, 

in the opinion of the umpire, he plainly make no effort 

1 out of the wav of the pitched ball and purposelj 
permit himself to be hit. 

SEC 5. If the catcher interfere with him in or prevent 
him from striking at a pitched hall. 



RULE 54. 

Section- 1. 



Entitled to Bases. 
'I In- base runner shall he entitled, with 
out liability to he put out. to advance a base 
in the following e.i 

If. while the batsman, the umpire calls "Four 
l>alls. ,„• award him first base by being hit by a pitched 
ball or for being interfered with by the catcher in striking 
at a pitched ball. 

Sec _>. If, while the batsman, a fair hit hall strike the 
person or clothing of the umpire or a base runner on fair 
ground. 

Sec. 3. if the umpire award to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hil by a pitched hall, or 
; • '■■ interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runnei be thereby forced to yacati 
base held by him. 

SEC 4. If the umpire call a "Balk" 

Sec .s. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
apd touch the umpire or any fence or building wijhin 

ninety (1,01 feet of the I, ,-' base. 

Sec 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the 

obstruction of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 

his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

Sec. 7. If the fielder slop or catch a baited ball with 



40 

his cap. glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place on his person. 



Returning to Bases. 

The base runner shall return to his base 
RULE 55. without liability to be put out : 

Section i. If the umpire declare a foul 
tip (as defined in Rule 46) or any other foul hit, not legally 
caught by a fielder. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declare a foul strike. 

Sec. 3. If the umpire declare a dead hall, unless it be 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be thereby forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 54. Section 3. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
fere with the catcher in an attempt l<i throw or the umpire 
be struck by a ball thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the batman's person. 

Sec. 6. In any and all of these cases the base runner is 
not required to touch the intervening bases in returning 
to the base he is legally entitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 

The base runner is out : 
RULE 56. Section i. If, after three strikes have 

been declared against him while the bats- 
man, the third strike ball lie not legally caught and he 
plainly attempts In hinder the catcher from fielding the 
ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touch- 
ing the ground or any object other than a fielder; pro- 
vided, if it be not caught in a fielder's hat. cap. protector, 
pocket or other pan of his uniform. 

Sec. 3. If. when the umpire has declared "Three 
Strikes" on him while the batsman, the third strike- ball 
be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground; provided, if it be not caught in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other pari of his uniform, or touch 
some object other than a fielder before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
touched first base. 



41 

Sec. 5. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball In- 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 

any part of his person before such base runner touch first 

base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to firs! base, while the ball is being fielded to 
first base, -he run outside the three-foot lines, as defined 
in Rule 7, unless he do SO to avoid a fielder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sec. 7. If, in running from first to second base, from 
second to third base, or from third to home base, he run 
more than three feet from a direct line between a base 
and the next one in regular or reverse order to avoid being 
touched by a ball in the hands of a fielder. But in case 
a fielder be occupying a base runner's proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runner shall 
run out of direct line to the next base and behind said 
fielder and shall not be declared out for so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fail to avoid a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner described in sections 6 and 7 
of this rule, or in any way obstruct a fielder in attempting 
to field a batted ball, or intentionally interfere with a 
thrown ball: provided, that if two or more fielders attempt 
to field a batted ball, and the base runner come in contact 
with one or more of them, the umpire shall determine 
which fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and 
shall not decide the base runner out for coming in contact 
with a fielder other than the one the umpire determines 
to be entitled to field such batted ball. 

Sec. g. If at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some 
pan 1 d' his person be touching the base he is entitled to 
occupy; provided, however, that the ball be held by the 
fielder after touching him, unless the base runner delib- 
erately knock it out of bis hand. 

Sec. 10. If, when a fair or foul hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as defined in Rule 46) be legally caught by a 
fielder, such ball be legally held by a fielder on the base 
occupied by the base runner when such ball was batted, 
or the base runner be touched with the ball in the bands 
of a fielder, before he retouch such base after such fair or 
foul bit ball was so caught ; provided, that the base runner 
shall not be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally 
caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the pitcher 
before the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 



42 

runner nut with it: but if the base runner, in attempting 
in reach a base; detach it from its fastening before being 
touched or forced out, be shall be declared safe. 

Sue. ii. If, when the batsman becomes abase runner, 
the first base, or the first and second liases, or the first, 
second and third liases be occupied, any base runner so 
occupying a base shrill cease to be entitled to hold it, and 
may be put out at the next base in the same manner as in 
running to first base, or by being touched with the ball in 
the hands of a fielder at any time before any base runner 
following him in the batting order be put out, unless the 
umpire should decide the lui of the batsman to be an in- 
field fly. 

Sec. 12. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching 
a fielder, and. in such ease, no base shall be run unless 
necessitated by the batsman becoming a base runner, but 
no run shall be scored or any other base- runner put out 
until the umpire put, the ball back into play. 

Sec. 13. If. when advancing bases, or forced to return 
to a base, while the ball is in play, he fail to touch the 
intervening base . if any. in the regular or reverse 

order as the case may be, he may be put out by the ball 
being held by .1 fielder 011 any base he failed to touch, or 
by being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder 

in the same manner as in running to firsi base; provided, 

that the base runner shall not be out in such case if the 
ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the 
fielder hold it on said ba 1 the base runner with it. 

Sec. 14. If. when the umpire call "Hay." after the 
suspension of a game, he fail to return to and touch the 
base he occupied when "Time" was called before tOUCh 
ing the next, base; provided, the base runner shall noi be 
out, in such case, if the hall be delivered I" the bat by 
the pitcher, before the fielder hold il on said base or touch 
the base runner with 

Overrunning First Base. 

15. The base runner in running to tir-t base mav 
overrun said base after touching it in pic-sing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being olT said base, pro- 
vided he return at once and retouch the base, after which 
he may be put out as ;r If. after - 

running first base, he turn in the direction of or attempt 
to run to second base, before returniit 1 base, he 

shall forfeit Mich exemption from liability to be put 



43 

Sec. if>. If. before two hands are out and while third 
ba e is occupied, the coacher stationed near that base shall 

run in the direction of home ha.se on or near the base line- 
while a fielder i-, making or trying to make a play on ,-i 
hatted hall not caughl on the fly, or on a thrown hall, and 
therehy draws a throw to home base, the base runner en 
titled to third base shall he declared out by the umpire 
for i he coacher's interference with and prevention of, the 
legitimate play. 

SEC. 17. If one or more members of the team at bat 
Stand or collect at or around a base for which a base 

runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall he declared oil! for the interference of his team 
male or team males 

Sec. is. if he touch home base before a base runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, if there he such preceding 

base runner, lose his right to third base. 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 57. base runner out, without waiting for an ap 
peal for such decision, in all cases where 
such player he put out in accordance with any of these 
rules, except Section-, [3 and 15 of Rule 56. 

Coaching Rules. 
The coacher shall he restricted to COS 
RULE 58. ing the has.- runner only, and shall nol 
address remarks except to the base runner, 
and then only in words of assistance and direction 111 run- 
ning bases. !l<- shall not. by words or signs, incite or try 
to incite the spectators to demonstrations, and shall not use 

language which will in any manner refer to or relied upon 
a player of the opposite cluh, the umpire or the spectators. 
Not more than two coach, is. who mihl he players in the 
uniform of the team at hat. shall he allowed to occupy the 

space between the players' ami the coacher's lines 

near first and the other near third base, to coach has.- 

runners, If there he more than the legal number of coach- 

1 this nil.- he violated in an the captam 01 

tin- opposite side may call the attention of the umpire to 
the offense, and thereupon the umpire must order the 

illegal coacher or o the bench, and if his order 

red within one minute, the umpire shall assess a 



44 

fine of $5.00 against each offending player, and upon a 
repetition of the offense, the offending player or players 
shall he debarred from further participation in the game, 
and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall he scored every time a 
RULE 59. base runner, after having legally touched 
the first three bases, shall legally touch the 
home base before three men are put out; provided, how- 
ever, that if he reach home on or during a play in which 
the third man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be made 
only when a base runner legally loses the right to the base 
he occupies and is thereby obliged to advance as the result 
of a fair hit ball not caught on the fly. 

UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
Power to Enforce Decisions. 

The umpire is the representative of the 
RULE 60. League and as such is authorized and re- 
quired to enforce each section of this code. 
He shall have the power to order a player, captain or man 
ager to do or omit to do any act which in his judgment is 
necessary to give force and effect to one or all of these 
rules, and to inflict penalties for violations of the rules as 
hereinafter prescribed. 

There shall be no appeal from any de- 
RULE 61. cision of the umpire on the ground that he 

was not correct in his conclusion 
whether a batted ball was fair or foul, a base runner safe 
or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on any Other 
play involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision ren- 
dered by him shall be reversed, except that he be con- 
vinced that it is in violation of one of these rules. The 
captain shall alone have the right to protest against a 
decision and seek its reversal on a claim that it is in con- 
flict with a section of the 



Must Not Question Decisions. 

I ml. t no circumstances shall a captain 
RULE 62. or player dispute the accuracy <>f the um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 



RULE 63. 



45 
Clubs Can Not Change Umpire. 

The umpire can not be changed during a 
championship Kami' by the consent of the 
contesting clubs unless the official in charge 

be incapacitated from service by injury or ill- 



of the field 
ness. 

Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

In all case- of violation of these rules, by 
RULE 64 either a player or manager, the penalty for 

the first offense shall he a fine by the um- 
pire of $5.00. and. for a second offense, prompt removal 
of the offender from the game or grounds, followed by 
a period of such suspension from actual service in the club 
as the president of the League may fix. 



Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire shall within twelve houi 
RULE 65. after fining or removing a player from the 
game, forward to the president a report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause therefor. 

Immediately upon being informed by thi 
RULE 66. umpire that a line has been imposed upon 

any manager, captain or player, the presi 
dent shall notify the pel led and also the club of 

which he is a member; and. in the event of the failuri 
the person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League 
the amount of said tine within five days after notice, he 
shall he debarred from participating in any championship 
game or from sitting on a player's bench during the prog- 
of a championship game until such line he paid. 

When the offense of the player debarred 
RULE 67. from the game be of a flagrant nature, 
such as the use of Obscene language 01 an 
assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire shall within 
four hours thereafter forward to the president of the 
League full particulars. 

Warning to Captains. 

The umpire shall notify both captains 

RULE 68. before the game, and in the presence of 

each other, that all the playing rules will 

he strictly and impartially enforced, and warn them that 



46 

failure on their part to co operate in such enforc< 
will result in offenders being fined, and, if necessary to 
preserve discipline, debarred from the game. 

On Ground Rules. 

Before the commencement of a game the 
RULE 69. umpire shall see thai the rules governing 

all the materials of the game are strictly 

observed He shall ask the captain of the home club 
whether there are any special ground rules, and if there 
be he shall acquaint himself with them, advise the cap 
tain of the visiting team of their scope and see thai 
is duly enforced, provided that it does not conflict with 
any of these rules. 

Official Announcements. 

The umpire shall call "Play" at the hour 
RULE 70. appointed for the beginning of a game, an- 
nounce "Time" a1 gal interruption 
and declare "Game" at its legal termination. 

Suspension of Play. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the 
RULE 71. following can 

r. If rain fall so heavily as to cause the 
spectators on the open field and open stands to seek shelter, 
in which case he -hall note the time of suspension, and 
should rain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter 
he shall terminate the game. 

2. In case of an accident which incapacitates him or a 
player from service in the field, or in order to re) 
from the grounds any player or spectator who has viol 
the rules, or in case of (ire, panic or other extraordinary 
circumstan* 



RULE 72. 



Call of Time. 
In suspending play from any legal cause 
umpire shall call "I ime"; when he calls 
"j mie." play shall be suspended until he 
calls Play" again, and during the interim no player shall 
be put ..ut, base he run or run he scored. "Time" shall 
not be called by the umpire until the ball be held bv the 
pitcher while standing in his position. 



47 



Decisions on Balis and Strikes. 

The umpire shall call and count as a 
RULE 73. "ball" any unfair ball delivered by the 
pitcher to the batsman. He shall also call 
and counl as a "strike" any fairly delivered ball which 
passes over any portion of the home base, and within the 
batsman's legal range as denned in Rule 31, whether struck 
at or noi bj the batsman; 01 a foul tip which is caught 
by the catcher standing within the lines of his position, 
within to feel of the home base; or which, after hems 
struck at and not hit. strike the person of the batsman; 
or when the hall he bunted foul by the bat-man; or any 
foul hit hall not caught on tin- fly unless the batsman has 
two striki ed, however, that a pitched ball shall 

noi bi 1 all ■ ud a "ball" or "strike" by the umpire 

until it has passed the home plate. 

If bin one umpire he assigned, his duties 

RULE 74. and jurisdiction shall extend to all points, 

and he shall be permitted to take his stand 

in any part of the held that in his opinion will best enable 

him i,, discharge hi- duties. If two umpires be assigned 
lo a , assistant umpire .-hall decide all plays at 

first and second ba 



Field Rules. 
No person shall he 



, allowed upon any 

RULE 75. part of the Held during the progress Of a 

game except '- in uniform, the 

manager of each side, the umpire, such officers ol the 1 law 

-cut in uniform, and such watchmen Oi the 
home club as may be necessary to prcsen ce. 

manager, captain or player shall ad 
RULE 76. ctators during 

in reply lo a re<|Uesl for information abOUl 
the progress or slate of the game. 

Every club shall furnish sufficient p 
RULE 77. ,ls own 

and in the event of a crowd 
mg the field during 1 he progress of a game, and mtcrtcr- 
mg with the play in any manner, the vi-iting chth may 
refuse 1,, play until the held be cleared. If the Held he not 
cleared within li minutes thereafter, the visiting club may 
Claim and shall be entitled to the game by a -core 01 nine 






48 

runs to none (no matter whal number of innings has 
been played ). 

General Definitions. 
"Play" is the order of the umpire to 

RULE 78. gin the game or to resume il after its suspen- 
sion. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to sus- 
RULE 79. pend play. Such suspension must not ex- 
tend beyond the day. 

"Game" is the announcement of the urn- 
RULE 80. ptre that the game is terminated. 

"An inning" is the term at bat of the 
RULE 81. nine playt nting a club in a game 

and is completed when three of such play- 
ers have been legally put out. 

"A lime at Bat" i- the term at bat of a 
RULE 82. batsman. It begins when he takes bis po- 
sition, and continues until he is put out 
or becomes a base runner. But a time at bat shall not be 
charged against a batsman who is awarded firsl base by the 
umpire for being bit by a pitched ball or for the illegal 
delivery of tbe pitcher '>r on called balls or when be makes 

rifice hit. 

"Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
RULE 83. by these rules. 



THE SCORING RULES. 

'I'" promote uniformity in scoring chani- 
RULE 84. piotuhip games the following instructions 

are given and suggestions and definitions 

made for tbe guidai, and they are required to 

make all scores in ice therewith. 



The Batsman's Record. 

TOM I. The lirst item in tbe tabu 
RULE 85. lated fter tbe player's name and 

position, shall be the number of times be 
has i t during the game, but tbe exceptions made 

in Rule Kj must not be inch: 

SEC ±. In the second column shall be set down tbe runs, 
if any. made by each player. 



49 

Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the firs* 
nits, if any, made b) eai b player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 
Sec .4. A base ini shall Ik- scored in the following 0.1 ■ 
When the ball from the hat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and <>m of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fair hit ball is partially or wholly Stopped bv 

••1 fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himseli 
m time to field the bail to first before tin- striker reaches 
that base or to force "tit another base runner. 

When th,- ball Ik- hit with such for.-, to an infield* 
pitcher that he can not handle it in time to |int out the 
batsman -1 basi runner. In a case of doubt 

over this class of hits, a ba 1 hil should be scored and 
the fielder exempts the charge of an error. 

When tin- hall is hit so -lou.lv toward a lieMcr thai he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the hat-man or 
'"it a base runner. . 

In all case-, where a base runner is retired by being nit 
by a hatted hall, the batsman should he credited with a 
base hit. 

When a batted ball hiis th or clothing of the 

umpire, as defined in Rule 51- Section _>. 

in no ored when a base runnet 

is forced out by the play. 

Sacrifice Hits. 
. Sec. 5. In the fourth column shall he placed the sacri- 
fice hits. 
A sacrifice hit shall he credited to the batsman who. 

when n,, , lllt ,„- when but one man 1- out. ad- 

runner a base by a hunt hit. which results m the 
batsman being put out b< i n,M - '"' would s0 

result if it wen- handled without en 

Fielding Records. 
Sec. 6. The numbei oi opp if any, pul out by 

r: " " player shall be set down in th- fifth column, u 
the batsman is given out by the umpire for a I 
'"' tails to hat J,, proper order, the put-out shall 
to the catcher. In cases of the base runner hems declared 
for inter! u of line, or on an in- 

field fly, the "out" s|,,,nld be credited t" the player wno 






50 

would have made the piny but for the action of the I 
runner or the announcement of the umpire. 

Sec 7. The number of times, if any, each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall be set down in the sixth 
column. An assist should be given to each player who 
handles the hall in aiding in a run nut or any other play 
of the kind, except the one who completes it. 

An assist should he given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out. even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting 
player. 

And generally an assist should he given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in handling the 
ball from the I eaves the bat until it reaches the 

player who makes the pul out, or in case of a thrown 
ball, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put-OUt results, or would result if 
no error were made by a team-mate. 

Assists should he credited to every player who handles 
the hall in the play which results in a base runner >■■ 
called "out" for interference or for running out of line. 

Errors. 

Sec. 8. An error shall be given in the se lumn 

for each misplay which prolongs the time at hat of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out. Hut a wild pitch, a base on hall-, a base awarded to 
a batsman by being struck by a pitched hall, an illegal 
pitch, a balk and a passed hall, each of which is a battery 
and not a fielding error, shall not he included in the seventh 
column. 

An error shall not he charged against the catcher for a 
wild throw in an attempt to prevent a stolen base, unless 
the base runner advance an extra b < the error. 

An error shall tu red against the catcher or an 

infielder who attempts to comjil. ble play, unless 

the throw be so wild that an additional base he gained. 

In case- a base runner advance a base through the failure 
of a baseman to stop or try to stop a hall accurately thrown 
to his base, he shall he charged with an error and not the 
player who made such throw, provided there were occasion 
for it. If such throw he made to second base the 
shall determine whether the second baseman or shortstop 
shall be charged with an error. 



51 

Stolen Bases. 
Sec 'i. \ stolen base shall be credited to the base run- 
ner whenever be advano unaided by a base hit, a 
put-out, a lielding or a battery error. 

The Summary. 

The Summary shall contain: 
RULE 86. Section t. The score made in each itl 

ning of the game and the total run- of each 
in the game. 
Sec 2. The number of stolen bases, if any. by each 
I'laycr. 

- .5. The number of two-base hits, if any, made bj 
each player. 

1 I he number Of three base hits, if any, made by 

Sec 5. The number of home runs, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec 6. The number of double and triple plays, il any, 
made by each side and th< names of the players assisting 
"i the same. ■ , i ■ 

7. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in. 

Sec. & I he number of base hits, if any, made oh 

pitcher. 

0, The number of times, if any. the pitcher strikes 
'he opposing batsmen. 

to, The number of times, if any, the pitcher gives 

s "'- II. The number of wild pitches, if any. charged to 

-'her. , . 

Sec 12, The number .T limes if any, the pitcher hits a 
ian with' a pitched ball. . 

iun ,bei ol pa sed balls by each catcher. 
Sec 14. me. 

15. The name of the umpire. 



52 



To Umpires, Managers and Players 



The good results produced by the following resolution 
which was adopted by the National League on March 4, 
1903, for a period of one year, led the organization at its 
last annual meeting to readopt this resolution and make it 
perpetual. The resolution is as follows: 

"Whereas, During the past season under the administra- 
tion of affairs by the President of this organization, proper 
steps were taken to preserve order and discipline on the 

ball field, and in this manner to Uphold the dignity of the 
game and the standard of this parent base ball organiza- 
tion, be it 

"Resolved, That the President of this organization is 
hereby vested with full and absolute power to maintain 
and discipline on the bail field; and that he shall 
have full power to discipline any player or manager for 
the viola! ion of good order upon the ball field. That this 
discipline shall be either in a fine or suspension from the 
ids of any club; that he shall be authorized to adopt 
such regulations for maintaining order on the ball field 
as he shall deem fit ami proper; that he shall have full 
and absolute power to ad upon any complaint made by the 
umpire against any player or manager for violation of 
Order; that in all cases where the penalty fixed is either 
a fine or suspension his decision shall be final; that in 
where he deems it fit and proper that the offender 
or offenders should be expelled from the organization, that 
such expulsion shall not go into effect until same has been 
ratified by the Hoard of Directors (the President not 

Ig) to carry a decree of expulsion into effect. That 
this resolution and the powers granted herein shall prevail 
until repealed, and that any provision either in the Consti- 
tution or Playing Rules of tin., organization in conflict 



53 

wiili the provisions of this resolution shall be mill and 
void during the life of this resolution* 

"Be it Further Resolved, That any line levied through 

the operation of this resolution shall he deducted by the 
club employing the player or manager so disciplined from 
the salary of said player or manager. 

"Be it Further Resolved, That during the suspension of 
any player or manager under the Operation of this resolu- 
tion no club shall be permitted to pay said player or 
manager thus disciplined the salary or any part thereof he 
would have drawn during the lime of suspension." 

The President desires to return his thanks to cluh own 
ers, umpires, managers and players for their co-operation 
in living up to the spirit of this above resolution during the 
playing season of C903; and he hopes that this co-operation 
will prevail during the coming season. 

The standard of hall was materially improved during 
the past year and the results of the contests were more 
satisfactory alike to Spectator and player. 

The same strict enforcement of this resolution will he 
followed during the season of 1904. 
Respectfully. 

Harry C. IVu.iam. 

President. 



54 






Annual Meeting of the National 
League and American Association 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs 

Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City, December 8 to 10, 1903. 

Tuesday. December 8, 1903. 

Meeting called to order at 2:30 P, M. : President Harry 
C. Pulliam in the chair. 

Present : 

A. II. SoDEN, representing the B" 
tion. 

C. H. Ebbets and H. R. Von dek Hoest, representing 
the Brooklyn Ball Club. 

James A. Hart, representing the Chicago League Ball 
Club. 

August Herrmann, Max Fi.kisi iimann and George B. 
Cox, representing the Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

John T. Bsusb and Ashley Lloyd, representing the 
National Exhibition Company, 

James Potter and J. K. EVAKS Roberts, representing the 
Philadelphia Base Ball and Exhibition Company. 

Barney Dreytuss and \V. II. Locke, representing the 
Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

Frank deHass Robison, representing the American 
Base Ball and Athletic Exhibition Company. 

The minutes of the reconvened annual meeting of March 
4, 1903, were read and approved. 

On motion, \V. 11. Locke was appointed secretary pro 
tern. 

Chairman Soden of the Hoard of Directors read the 
report of the Board, which approved the financial report 



55 



reporl of Trustee 
. and carried with ii the 



of Treasurer Pulliam as well 
Young mi the S per cent fun 

following resolution: 

"Resolved, Thai the Pittsburg Base Bali Club of Pitts 
burg, Pa., having won the greatest percentage of games 
i" the championship series, is hereby awarded the Base 
Ball Championship of the National League for ioo.v" 

On motion, the report of the Hoard was approved. 

The President read his annual reports, which were 

approved. 

Mr. Herrmann submitted the new National Agreement 
as approved by the National Commission, which was ac- 
cepted, approved and ratified by the National League. 

On motion, the Hart Klcisrlnnann resolution for the 
maintenance of good order on the hall field during the 
*a on ,,f [003 was reaffirmed and the resolution made 
Permanent. 

The election of officers being in order, the secretary pro 
'em was instructed to cast the vote of the league for 

Harry c. Pulliam as President, Secretary and Treasurer of 

the league for the ensuing year. 

'hi motion, a recess was taken until December <). 



Wednesday, December o, 1903. 

Meeting reconvened at I :,(o I' M.. all clubs present and 

the President in the chair. 

The Chair submitted the uniform contract approved by 
the National Commission, which, with an amendment of- 
1 by Mr. Herrmann, was unanimously adopted, 

On motion, the Chair appointed the following standing 

committees: 

Schedule -M.-s-.rs. Dreyfuss, Mart and Ebbets. 

Playing Rub-. Messrs. Hart. Hanlon and Max Fleisch- 
"lann. 

nstitutional Amendments Messrs, Herrmann, Brush 
and Potter. 



56 

The election of the Board of Directors was then taken 
up. and Mr. Locke was instructed to cast the vote of the 
League for the old Board, namely. Messrs. Soden, Hart, 
Dreyfuss and Brush. 

A recess was then taken until December 10. 



Thursday, December to, 1903. 

Meeting reconvened, all clubs being present; the Presi- 
dent in the chair. 

Mr. Hart was appointed to represent the National League 
and co-operate with representatives of the .American League 
and the National Association of Professional Base Ball 
I .eagues in trying to bring the Pacific Coast League into 
the National Agreement. 

On motion of Mr. Sodin. the meeting adjourned, subject 
to the call of the Chair. 



57 



Reconvened Annual Meeting of the 

National League and American 

Association of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City, Tuesday, March 1. 1904, to 
Friday, March 4, 1904. 

Tuesday, March i. 1904. 

Meeting called to order at ,1:20 P. M. by President 
Pulliarn. 

Present: 

A. H. Soden and \V. 11. CoNANT, representing the 
Boston Base Ball Association. 

Charles Ebbkts and Edward Hanlon, representing the 
lyn Ball Club. 

AUGUST Herrmann and Max FtEISi umann, represent- 
ing Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

John T. Brush, representing the National Exhibition 
( 'oinpany. 

James Potter and Edwin I. Hvneman, representing the 
Philadelphia Base Ball and Exhibition Company. 

Barney Dreyfuss and Well Locke, representing the 
I 'lit -burg Athletic Company. 

FRANK DEHASS ROBISON, representing the American 

Base Ball and Athletic Exhibition Company of St. bonis. 

The minutes of the December, [903, meeting were read 
and approved. 

in response to a communication from President Johnson 
of the American League, joint meetings of the committees 
on Rules and Schedules of the National and American 
Leagues were arranged for Wednesday. March 2. 

At 6:30 P.M. a recess was taken until 12 o'clock Wednes- 
day, March 2. 



58 

Wednesday, March 2, 1904. 

Meeting called to order at 3:30 P. M. by the President. 

Neither the schedule nor playing rules committees being 
ready to report, a recess was taken until Thursday, 
March 3. 

Thursday, March 3, 1004. 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock noon, the President 
in the chair. 

On motion, it was decided that when this meeting ad- 
journ it do so subject to the call of the President. 

Chairman Hart of the Playing Rules Committee pre- 
sented the complete revised code of playing rules as ap- 
proved by the joint committee, and on motion it was 
unanimously adopted. 

Mr. Hart, as representative of the National League, made 
a verbal report on the result of the efforts made by the 
joint committee of the National and American Leagues 
and the National Association of Professional Base Ball 
Leagues to bring the Pacific Coast League within the folds 
of the National Agreement. 

Mr. Hanlon, representative of the National Association 
of Professional Base Ball Leagues on the committee, sup- 
plemented Mr. Hart's report. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved, That the President shall instruct all umpires 
and notify all club members that, after an umpire has 
called play at the beginning of any championship game, 
there shall not lie allowed any presentation of any char- 
acter to any player or manager upon the ball field. " 

Mr. Brush presented the report of the Committee on 
Constitutional Amendment--. As reported by the committee, 
the revision of the Constitution carried with it the amend- 
ments as follows : 

1. The words "American Association" are stricken from 
the title page, the heading on the first page and from 
Section 1. 



2. 3. 4 an> S has been 



59 

2. The wording of Sections 
changed. 

3. Sections 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 remain as they were, ex- 
cepting that in Section 9, in the third line from the last, 
the word "all" is stricken out and the word "seven" in- 
serted. 

4. Additions have been made to Sections 11, 12 and [3. 

5. Sections 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 remain as they were, 
except that in Section 16, in the last line, the word "three" 
is stricken out and the word "two" inserted. 

6. An addition has been made to Section 19. 

7. Section 20 remains intact. 

8. An addition has been made to Section 21. 

9. Sections 22, 23 and 24 remain intact. 

10. Slight changes have been made in Sections 25 and 26. 
it. Sections 27, 28 and 29 remain intact. 

12. Slight changes have been made in Section 30. 
i.j. Section 31 remains as it was. 

14. Changes have been made in Sections 32, 33 and 34. 

15. Section 35 remains intact. 

16. Section 36 has been changed. 

17. Section yj remains intact. 

18. Sections 38, 39, 40 and 41 have been changed. 

19. Sections 42. 43. 44. 45 and 4(1 remain intact. 

20. Section 47 has been changed. 

21. Section 48 remains intact. 

22. Sections 49, 50 and 51 have been changed. 

23. Sections 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58. 50. (.0. 01 and 02 re- 
main intact. 

24. Sections 63 and 04 have been changed. 

On motion, the Constitution, as amended, was unani- 
mously approved. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted: 
"Resolved, That no club member of the National League 
shall play any game of base ball with any independent, 

professional, serai-professional or amateur club containing 



60 

in its team any player or players ineligible under the rules 
of the National Agreement, or under suspension by any 
clubs of the National League, American League or; National 
Association; and furthermore, that no game of base- ball 

shall be played by any National League club willi any hide 
pendent club that shall have played any games with any 
Other independent club containing such ineligible or mis 
pended players as hereinbefore described.'' 

At .? :.^o P. M. a recess was taken. 

After recess, the I. .-ague, it 5:45 P. M., was called to 
order by the Chair. 

On motion, the President of the League was instructed to 
notify all managers that prior to the beginning of a game 
no batting practice will be allowed in the Space between 

the foul line- and the stands set aside for spectators. 
A recess was taken until Friday, March 4. 



Friday, March 4, 1904. 
Meeting reconvened at 11 A. M., and, on motion, a 
further recess was taken until 3 o'clock P. M. same day. 
After recess, the League was called lo order at 3:15 

o'clock P. M. by the President. 

Mr. Ebbets, from the Committee on Schedule, presented 
the playing schedule as agreed upon by the joint commit- 
tee, and same was unanimously adopted. 

There being no further business, an adjournment was 
taken, subject to the call of the Chair. 



61 

Officers and Members 

The following is an official list of the officers of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and Officers of Clubs, Members thereof, 
for the season of 1904 : 

President, Secretary and Treasurer 

Harry C. Pulliam. 

Rooms 1424-1426 St. James Building, New York City. 

Telephone, 2209 Madison (Long Distance). 

Board of Directors 
A. H. Soden, James A. Hakt, John T. Brush and Barney Dreyfhss. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION. BOSTON, MASS. 
A. H. Soden, President. 410 Atlantic Ave. 

J. B. Billings, Treasurer, Box 1750. 



BROOKLYN BALL CLUB, BROOKLYN, N. V. 
Charles H. Ebbets, President, H. R. Von DEB HOBST, Treasurer. 

F. A. Abel. Vice-President, Edward Hanlon. Manager. 

CINCINNATI EXHIBITION COMPANY. CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

August Herrmann, President, 
Max C. Fi.eisohmann, Secretary and Treasurer, Wiggins Block. 

CHICAGO LEAGUE BALL CLUB, CHICAGO. ILL. 
James A. Hakt. President, Fisher Building. 

PITTSBURG ATHLETIC COMPANY. PITTSBURG. PA. 

Barney Dkeyfuss. President, W. II. Locke. Secretary, 

903 Farmers' Bank Building. 

PHILADELPHIA BASE BALI. AND EXHIBITION COMPANY. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

James Potter. President. J. R- Evans ROBERTS, Secretary, 

Arthur K. Newbold, Vice-President, 

702 Chestnut Street 

NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY. NEW YORK. 

John T. Brush, President, 

Fred M. Knowles. Secretary-Treasurer. Room 726 St. James Building. 

AMERICAN BASE BALL AND ATHLETIC EXHIBITION COMPANY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Frank DkIIass Roiiixon. President, 

M. Stanley Robison, Treasurer. W. C. Schofield, Secretary. 






62 



Official National League Averages 



Official Batting- and Fielding Averages of National League players who 
participated in fifteen or more championship games in any one position during 
the season of 1903 : 

BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. A.B. R. H. t.b. 2b. 3b. ii.u. p.c.s.ii.s.b. 

•Kennedy, Pittsburg 18 68 7 21 31 4 3 .362 2 

Wagner, Pittsburg 129 512 97 1x2 266 :t" 19 B .888 s 4ft 

Donltn; Cincinnati 121 Jiifi no 174 2r.il 26 18 7 .861 8 26 

flail... Pittsburg 102 127 88 160 227 32 16 ." .361 IS 21 

Bresnaban, New York ill 406 87 142 200 SO 8 4 .860 12 84 

Seymour, Cincinnati 18S 688 88 191 2i" 2r, 18 7 .312 13 25 

Ii.u iiu I. Pittsburg Ml 613 137 209 272 80 6 7 .:;il 12 2:1 

Sheckard, Brooklyn 139 616 99 1 T 1 246 29 9 9 332 2" 67 

Thomas, Philadelphia 180 177 sx 166 171 11 2 1 .327 20 it 

Chance, Chicago 12:: ill 83 in 194 21 10 2 .827 2 87 

Becfcley, Cincinnati 119 469 85 150 205 29 l" 2 .327 I" 23 

Donovan, st. Louie 1":. 410 68 I'M 166 15 3 .327 it 2.-. 

HoGreedle, Bi klyn 66 21:: to at 71 .". " .321 3 10 

Kelster, Philadelphia 100 400 .v. 12s I7x 27 7 3 .32" ■.. 11 

Ki-ll.y. Cincinnati 104 883 86 121 160 22 I 3 .111; 7 IX 

Browne, New York 14] 681 106 185 220 20 3 8 .313 11 27 

Doyle, Brooklyn 138 624 >•! ml 203 27 1; .31:: n 84 

Tenney, Boston 122 117 79 1 K> 177 22 3 .: 813 16 21 

Stelnfeldt, Cincinnati lis 439 71 137 211 32 12 't .312 11 13 

Wolverton, Philadelphia 123 494 72 182 189 13 12 808 28 i" 

Slagle, Chicago 189 843 i"i 162 194 2.. 6 " .298 18 S3 

Leach, Pittsburg .' 127 :.»7 :i7 161 222 Hi 17 7 .20s 12 22 

Kling, Chicago 132 mi 67 146 2H> 29 13 3 ,297 :i 23 

Smoot, si. Lonis 12ii 600 67 1 is mx 32 S I .296 Is 17 

Brers, Chicago 123 mi "" 136 177 27 7 .293 11 26 

Daly, Cincinnati 79 3117 13 90 12.". II 9 1 .2113 7 6 

Tinker, Chlcag 121 400 67 .131 17.', 21 7 2 .2!il 13 27 

Casey, Chicago 112 438 mi 1211 113 .x 3 1 ,2i«i 20 11 

Cooley, Boston 13s 668 7'; 160 209 21; 10 I .289 3 27 

Cincinnati 88 888 'ti ill 137 2.' 3 .288 7 11 

Bltchey, Pittsburg 137 606 66 11:, 193 28 i" " .287 12 1; 

Titus, Philadelphia 73 2x,, 88 80 113 1;, 1; 2 .286 I" 

Burke, s i. Lonis 113 431 55 128 142 13 3 .288 7 28 

•NOTE— Kennedy baring participated In bnt ten complete games, the bat- 
ting championship ,,f ti„- National League for ti,,' season ol 1908 l« award- 
ed t., Wagner, ol the Pittsburg Club. llAUUY c. I'II.i.iam, s.-.-y. 



63 

UATTING-Continucd. 

Name and Club. o. A.ii. it. H. t.b. 

on, Philadelphia mi; m gg 117 |gj 

Warner, x, • « Vi.rk gg 280 88 M 99 

Tones, !>.. Chicago 130 407 6a 1 l" 167 

Phelps, Plttsbnrg 7:1 273 32 77 gg 

Lander, New York ids 395 52 m 121 

Hearne, Brooklyn 19 .",7 8 16 23 

Mertea, New fork 138 ."'17 urn [46 226 

Sebring, Pittsburg 1 •_• t BG6 71 140 194 

McCarthy, Chicago 24 nil 11 28 38 

Barry, Philadelphia 138 530 W 152 189 

Bowerman, New York :.'.) 210 22 gg 71 

Both, Philadelphia 1:1 22u 27 60 7:1 

Strong, Brooklyn 185 508 101 188 166 

i': 11, St. Louie ISO .".r.> 83 141 186 

McOann, New Y..rk 12:1 1^2 7.". 180 172 

Tatklltsch, Brooklyn 65 176 :ti 17 64 

Lowe, Chloagi 2s 106 11 28 30 

Held, Pittsburg 127 500 68 184 177 

Oremlnger, Boston 140 511 ."'7 130 192 

Dahlen, Brooklyn 188 474 71 121 162 

Moran, Boston ins 889 in 1112 158 

Pelts, Cincinnati 102 358 .;. 93 ill 

Vim Haltren, New JTork .... 7.", 280 12 72 80 

Tones, 0., Bi klyn 88 127, 12 ::2 8 

Douglass, Philadelphia »7 ::77 1:; 86 112 

Bwlng, Cincinnati :il BE 17 24 .11 

Gilbert, New Y..rk 12s 118 62 104 116 

Stanley, Boston 7'.i :;ns in 77 n>2 

Harper, Cincinnati 17 56 7 11 20 

I'l Brooklyn gj 309 27 77 98 

Dunleavy, St. Louis 52 193 28 48 .".7 

Babb, New York 121 121 68 101 

Barclay, St Louis 107 119 :;7 104 180 

lliilsuiu. Philadelphia 188 ■■ • 1 T 1 

'. Brooklyn 18 184 20 88 [12 

Horrlssey, Cincinnati 27 89 11 22 2:: 

Mi 118 468 HI 118 I'll 

Krueger, Pittsburg 71 256 12 88 88 

UcCreery, B klyn, Boston. 61 224 2s ;,.-, 71 

Cincinnati 25 7i> 7 17 is 

De Montrerille, si. Louts 20 7<> B it 22 

B klyn 10 B7 5 8 9 

Dunn, New Y'.rk 72 257 SO <12 7!l 

ton 102 892 37 94 117 

r, St. Louis, Chicago.. 33 II 21 38 

Byan, gt Louis 66 227 is 54 64 



2B. 


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. 284 


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1 


.282 


■ 8 


15 


7 


:: 


2 


.282 


8 


2 


l:; 


n 





,281 


17 


19 


;: 


2 





.281 


8 


2 


32 


1 1 


7 


.280 


11 


43 


16 


13 


4 


.277 


4 


20 


5 








.277 


2 


8 


24 


5 


1 


.276 


14 


28 


6 


., 


1 


.27i; 


4 


5 


11 


4 





.27:1 


1 


3 


21 


5 





.272 


8 


46 


25 


8 


1 


.272 


4 


17 


21 


6 


:i 


.270 


80 


::.; 


8 


:: 


1 


.2117 


1 


4 


5 


3 





.2117 


:; 


5 


23 


7 


2 


,260 


12 


13 


24 


!) 


5 


.264 


s 


12 


17 


a 


1 


.262 


8 


84 


25 


5 


7 


.262 


7 


8 


15 


8 


O 


.260 


.1 


7 


8 


1 





. 257 


7 


1 1 


1 








,256 


3 


11 


5 


4 


1 


.2.'.:, 


11 


6 


3 


2 





. 258 


1 


O 


'.1 





1 


. 259 


26 


37 


12 





1 


.2. r m 


4 


10 


2 


2 


D 


.250 


O 


1 


15 


2 





.24!) 


18 


11 


:i 


3 





,248 


7 


10 


16 


8 


6 


.2 IS 


11 


22 


10 


8 





.2 Is 


1 


12 


22 


9 


1 


.217 


11 


10 


8 


8 





.217 


8 


9 


1 








.217 


:t 


:i 


18 


7 


2 


.246 


1 


12 


6 


8 


1 


.246 


8 


5 


7 


8 


1 


,246 


4 


11 


1 








.248 


8 





:t 


1 





.243 


2 


3 











.243 


1 





15 


1 


II 


211 


s 


12 


12 


4 


1 


240 


5 


in 


5 


2 


1) 


.240 


1 


1 





1 


1 


.238 


7 


2 



64 

BATTING-Continued. 

Name and Club. G. A.B. R. H. T.B. 

Wearer, St. Lottie, PItUburg. 32 117 12 23 25 

Dobbs, Chicago, Brooklyn L26 475 69 112 160 

Jordan, Brooklyn 77 2(;7 27 <>3 76 

Bitter, Brooklyn 75 258 26 61 82 

O'Neill, .1. J., St. Louis 71 240 23 58 69 

Williams, W.,Chlc, Phil, Boa, IS r,i 4 12 12 

Brain, St. Louis 118 404 44 [67 148 

Hsrley, Chicago 108 386 72 89 100 

Duggtehy, Philadelphia 36 104 10 24 31 

Hackett, St. Louis 96 351 24 80 109 

Abbatichlo, Boston 133 489 61 111 142 

Bergen, Cincinnati B8 2.17 21 47 55 

O'Neill, m. J., st. Louis :;2 110 12 25 81 

Brashear. Philadelphia 20 75 9 17 2o 

Uathewaon, Kew S"ork 45 124 13 2h 3 1 

Rauli, Chicago 27 84 6 19 26 

Piatt, Boston 25 71 7 16 16 

Dexter, Boston 120 4.77 82 102 128 

Taylor, .1., Chicago 36 120 13 2s 39 

Banner, Beaton 40 17:: 11 38 40 

rammer, Philadelphia 35 lis 9 20 34 

Do,, in, Philadelphia 63 188 18 41 48 

Magoon, Cincinnati 41 136 6 80 86 

Aubrey, Boston M 828 20 69 si 

Hallman, Philadelphia 57 198 2u 12 r.7 

Klttredge, Boston 80 99 10 21 2.'! 

Williams, <)., St. Loula, Chic. !M( 317 24 67 BO 

Phllllppe, Pittsburg 37 124 20 20 34 

Doheny, Pittsburg 27 in 11 19 20 

McGtnnity, New Y.irk 58 168 12 31 36 

Praser, Philadelphia 32 98 12 19 27 

Murphy, St. Louis 24 64 4 18 14 

afenefee, Chicagi 22 64 3 13 U3 

Mitchell, Philadelphia 2s 95 n 19 2:: 

Schmidt, Brooklyn 41 H'7 17 21 27 

Welmer, Chlcag 86 lo7 16 21 28 

Cronin, New York 20 46 6 11 11 

Brown, St. Loula 26 77 4 15 111 

Nichols, St Loula 33 120 13 23 26 

Willis, Boston 39 12h 9 24 27 

Smith, Pittsburg 01 212 16 37 44 

Phillips, Cincinnati 16 57 6 10 10 

Brans, I ; ■ Uyn 15 29 5 5 

Leever, Pittsburg 86 116 11 in 21 

Malm, Cincinnati 34 112 11 is 24 

laalarkey, Boston 32 87 12 14 20 



2n 


3li. 


H.R. 


P.C. S.H. 1 


5.B. 





1 





.237 


1 


1 


16 


8 


2 


.230 


16 


23 


11 


1 





.236 


6 


9 


9 








.236 


9 


9 


9 


1 


II 


.230 


5 


11 


11 


II 





.235 


1 


1 


8 


16 


1 


.231 


7 


21 


!l 


1 





.231 


15 


27 


5 


1 


II 


.231 


3 





13 


8 





.228 


2 


2 


18 


6 


1 


.227 


17 


23 


I 


2 





.227 


4 


2 


2 


2 





.227 





3 


3 


11 





.227 


2 


2 


3 





1 


.220 


16 


1 


3 


2 





.226 


2 


3 





11 


9 


.225 








18 


1 


3 


.223 


12 


32 


3 


4 





.222 


3 


3 


6 





1 


.220 


4 


2 


3 


1" 


1 


.220 


3 


3 


5 


1 





.21S 


4 


6 


6 








.210 


5 


2 


8 


2 





.212 


9 


7 


11 


2 





.212 


13 


2 


2 








.212 


6 


1 


9 


2 





.211 


7 


14 


4 


2 





.210 








1 








.209 


1 


1 


1 








.206 


13 


4 


:: 


1 


1 


.204 


2 


4 


1 








.203 


2 





3 








.203 


2 





1 


II 





.200 


2 





1 


1 


1 


.1110 


5 


3 


4 


II 





. 190 


1 





11 


1 





,196 


2 


2 


2 


1 





. 1 98 


2 


2 


2 








.192 


2 


6 


3 








.188 


2 





3 


2 





.175 


9 


2 











.175 








11 








.172 


4 








1 





.165 


4 





4 


1 





.101 


4 


1 


2 


2 





.161 


1 






65 

BATTING-Continued. 

Name and Club. u. a.u. it. h. t.h. 2b. 3b. h.r. p.c. s.h. s.b. 

Miller, New Vurk lr. .11 1 5 7 2 U .101 

Currle, St. Louis, Chicago 2s 59 2 9 11 1 .153 2 

Taylor, I,., New York 33 S2 7 12 12 (I (I I) .140 « 

Sutthofr, Cluclnnutl :!o 84 11 12 10 :i 2 .148 2 1 

Rnoades, St. Louis 18 50 4 7 7 .140 2 

Lumlgren, Chicago 27 (ll 7 7 .118 3 1 

Plttenger, Boston 44 i2,s 9 14 17 1 .100 3 

Sparks, Philadelphia 2s 92 7 10 12 2 .109 8 

McFarland, St. Louis 28 74 3 8 1 00 .108 3 1 

Carviu, Brooklyn 38 106 12 8 8 .075 5 



FIELDING 

FIRST BASEMEN. 
Pat 

• Games. out. Assist s. 

Ryan, St. IjiuIs is 174 •.., 

Medium, New York i2!i uss 84 

Douglass, Philadeliihlu 07 902 51 

Doyle, Brooklyn 139 ills s:i 

Brananeld, Pittsburg 127 1847 88 

Beckley, Cincinnati 110 1127 78 

Tenney, Boston 122 1145 98 

Barry, Philadelphia 80 281 13 

1I1. Chieag 121 1204 08 

Hackctt, St. Louis 89 947 10 

Nichols, St. Louis 25 27(1 3 

SECOND BASKML'N. 

Xaagoon, Cincinnati :>2 70 01 

Ritchey, Pittsbnrg 137 2si 400 

Gleason, Philadelphia 1112 236 280 

Bonner, Boston 24 64 3g 

Lowe, Chicago 22 37 72 

Brers, Chicago 110 245 306 

Duly, Cincinnati 70 i.m 221 

Gilbert, New York 12s :;i 1 ::w 

Abbatichlo, Boston lia 818 826 

Burke, St. Louis 15 26 58 

Ballman, Philadelphia 22 45 SB 

Jordan, Brooklyn 64 101 [82 

Fanvll. St. Louis IIS 2SI 894 

11 1. Brooklyn 84 186 216 

Mbrrlasey, Cincinnati 17 .:. 37 

Brashear, Philadelphia is 39 89 

Inmn, New York 10 28 46 





Total 


Per 


rrors 


chances. 


cent. 


2 


lsr, 


,999 


15 


1267 


.988 


15 


968 


.985 


29 


1530 


.981 


28 


1 168 


.981 


SO 


[285 


.070 


33 


1271 


.874 


8 


312 


.974 


36 


1808 


.1172 


2S 


1015 


.972 


8 


287 


,902 



5 


175 


.971 


30 


771 


.0(11 


22 


538 


,959 


6 


138 


,957 


11 


115 


:11s 


87 


588 


.987 


25 


307 


.987 


17 


727 


,985 


US 


686 


.934 


6 


89 


.0:::: 


8 


lis 


,982 


18 


251 


.928 


:,.; 


728 


.027 


84 


445 


.024 


6 


77 


.022 


7 


85 


,918 


8 


82 


.902 



m 



66 

FIELDING Continued. 
THIRD BASEMEN. 

I'm 

(lames, out. Assists. Errors. 

Wolverton, Philadelphia 128 182 217 27 

Steinfeldt, Cincinnati 104 160 212 2." 

Grerolnger, Boston 140 217 800 ■■<■ 

Dunn, New V.. ik 2."i 25 17 ii 

Casey, Chicago 112 143 190 :;l 

Strang, Brooklyn 121 117 24S '■■' 

Burke, St. Louis 03 138 198 

Lander, New York 108 140 194 34 

Tinker, Cbicagi 19 17 :;s 8 

Drain. St. I.' "is lr, 711 106 22 

Halhnan, Philadelphia 19 13 28 

Leach, Pittsburg 127 17s 292 85 

Jordan, Brooklyn is .:» 29 ;i 

SHORTSTOPS, 

Dahlen, Brooklyn 138 298 177 12 

an, Cini ininni 11.-, :;i;7 38 

er, Pittsburg 111 80S 397 5n 

New York 11:: 238 343 56 

Drain. St. Louis 7^ 168 :: 1 1 11 

Dunn. Now V'.rk 27 17 SO 18 

ton 22 In Is 9 

Hulswitt, Philadelphia 138 354 180 81 

Tinker, Chicago 107 22'.' 862 61 

Williams, 0., St. Louis A Chic, 7s 184 249 

De UontreTille, St. Lonla 15 -ii M) 8 

1. Pittsburg ,29 12 72 15 

Ai.h.iti. hi'., Boston 17 1.-, 12 13 

Aubrey, Boston 94 joi 14 

MULDERS. 

1. Brooklyn ):; , 1 

■fertes, New i'ork 137 285 24 

Dunlcavy, St. L..uia gg 58 11 2 

11.. Chicago ,..., 249 1 1 8 

Dobbs, Chicago and Brooklyn... 128 27s 12 9 

Barry, Philadelphia m,, ,, j 

Breanahan, New Fork si [50 11 

Thomas, Philadelphia 130 318 19 18 

Pittsburg mi teg in 7 

Vim Raltren, New V..rk ... 

Carney, Boston 1,2 10 6 

Cooley, Boston ise 248 11 IS 



T.itnl 


Per 


chances. 


cent. 


456 


.941 


396 


.937 


.-.:.:; 


.936 


77 




364 


.915 


12'.l 


.91 1 


:;7i 


.911- 


388 




01 


.802 


198 


.889 


13 


.SSI 


635 


.878 


88 


.868 


BUS 


.'.in; 


668 


.948 


7.-,n 




637 


.1112 


lis 


.908 


1 in 


.907 


!I7 


.007 


gee 


908 


662 


.906 


146 


.904 


si 


.901 


139 


.884 




.87(1 


660 


. 908 


hi 


,'..s| 


2'.l7 


,973 


71 


!>72 


.71 


.'.i7» 






233 


.970 


17" 




880 




is:, 


.062 


145 


,909 


12s 


968 


27" 





67 

FIELDING -KIKI.DKKS 
Put 

Games, oat. 

Donovan, St. Louis i 12 

Titus, Philadelphia -■> 121; 

Sheckard, Brooklyn [3fl ;:i i 

Kreuger, Pittsburg 28 is 

Beaumont, Pittsburg ill 258 

Kelley, Cincinnati 67 11" 

McCarthy, Chicago 21 33 

8n i. .St. Louis 12:1 23] 

Dexter, Boston 177 

Kelster, PhUadelphta 100 133 

Dolan, Cincinnati 93 107 

Slagle, Chicago 139 29a 

Sebrlng, Pittsburg 121 208 

McCreodie, Brooklyn 56 68 

Barley, Chicago m:: 192 

Browne, New STork m 212 

Seymour, Cincinnati 186 :ns 

Stanley, Huston 77 117 

Han-lay, s. Loots 1117 187 

Donlln, Cincinnati us 209 

HcCi ry, Brooklyn and Boston. 61 106 

PITCHERS. 

Murphy, st. Louis 11; 3 

Lundgren, Chlcag 27 8 

Mathewson, New x"ork 1:. is 

Schmidt, Brooklyn 10 11 

Kenned] . Pittsburg is 2 

Fras.r, Philadelphia :;l m 

Beidy, Brooklyn 1.-, g 

Phllllppe, Pittsburg :ii; n 

Willis, Boston 33 13 

Rwing, Cincinnati 29 12 

Leever, Pittsburg :;,; 12 

Brown, si. fools 211 :, 

sin tiK.rr. Cincinnati 30 10 

Taylor, 1.., New Sort S3 iu 

Taylor, .1., Chicago 27 m 

Malm. Cincinnati ::i 21; 

McFarland, si. Louis 2s 5 

Poole, Cincinnati 2.", :: 

Cronln, New V,,rk 20 B 

Harper, Cincinnati 17 7 

Brans, Brooklyn 1,-, 2 

Miller, Now York ir, s 



-Contin 


Lied. 


Total 


Tor 


Assists. 


Krrors. 


cbauces. 


cent. 


11! 


s 


166 


.852 


1:; 


7 


in; 


.'.152 


::>\ 


is 


368 


.'.151 


7 


3 


58 


.'.I4S 


1:, 


IS 


2ss 


.HIS 


8 


7 


122 


.1117 


3 


2 


IIS 


.'.'17 


It 


15 


201 


.1)12 


13 


12 


2n2 


.'.HI 


22 


ID 


165 


.839 


11 


s 


120 


.'.127 


HI 


21 


329 


.936 


21) 


is 


2lli 


.1127 


>; 


G 


so 


.925 


is 


1:. 




.'.122 


1:: 


211 


21.-. 


.'.IIS 


14 


36 


868 


.1102 


21 


15 


153 


.902 


1:; 


22 


222 


.'.ml 


IT, 


36 


2lli 


.'.HID 


6 


13 


125 


896 


::i 





:;i 


1.I.IKI 


M 


1 


49 


.980 


93 


3 


11 1 


.1)71 


inn 


1 


127 


.'.ill'.) 


211 


1 


22 


.969 


70 


:i 


87 


.966 


2:. 


1 


2S 


.1)114 


88 


2 


79 


.'.|(I2 


SI 


1 


Ml 


960 


so 


1 


86 


958 


71; 


4 


112 


957 


Oil 


:i 


08 


.956 


:.i 


:i 


117 


.'.i:,.-, 


02 


4 


70 


.1.17 


in 





111 


.Hill 


(17 


7 


lllll 




7.". 


6 


86 


,980 


02 


5 


70 


.929 


29 


3 


41 


.927 


4:i 


4 


:.! 


.926 


23 


2 


27 


.92(1 


17 


2 


27 


.930 



68 

F1KI.DING-PI 

i 

Garvin, Brooklyn 

Doggleby, Philadelphia 

Carrie, St. Looia and Chicago. . 

Doheny, Pittsburg 

Jones, Brooklyn 

Phillips, Cincinnati 

Weimer. Chicago 

Sparks, Philadelphia 

Menefee, Chicag 

afalarkey, Boston 

Mcdinnity, New York 

Bhoades, St. Looia 

O'Neill, If. J., St. r.imls ., 

Pittenger, Boaton 

Wicker, St. Looia and • !h 

Mitchell, Philadelphia 

Piatt, Boston 



(James. 
Warner, New York . . s.-, 
Zlmm.T. Philadelphia.. .'(■"' 

Kling, Chicago 182 

Wearer, si. Lo.,Pitts.. ::i 

Klttredge, Boaton 30 

Bowerman, New York. .%.", 

Smith, Plttabnrg 60 

Bergen, Cincinnati ... 58 

Ryan, St. Lonli 47 

Jaeklitsch, Brooklyn , 
Phelps, Plttabnrg .... 78 
O'Neill, J. .1.. st. I.... 7 1 

Ileum,., Brooklyn 17 

Pelts, Cincinnati 7* 

Bitter, Brooklyn 71 

Koran, Boaton 107 

Both, Philadelphia 80 

', Philadelphia .. . :,i 



PITCHERS- 


Continued. 








Pol 






Tntal 


Per 


amee. 


out. 


\sslsls. 


Errors. 


chances. 


cent. 


is. 


7 
18 


117 
80 


11 

9 


135 
102 


.918 




.912 


_'S 


9 


74 


8 


HI 


.912 


27 


17 


Ml 


1(1 


113 


.912 


88 


13 


75 


» 


97 


.907 


10 


3 


46 


5 


53 


.900 


38 


20 


00 


9 


(15 


.905 


28 


14 


59 


8 


81 


.901 


20 


13 


50 


8 


77 


.890 


82 


10 


75 


11 


102 


.892 


55 


31 


94 


10 


111 


.887 


17 


2 


2!) 


4 


35 


.880 


111 


6 


39 


6 


51 


.882 


44 


11 


84 


15 


113 


.887 


:a 


13 


48 


9 


07 


.806 


28 


10 


511 


111 


70 


.857 


25 


3 


37 


9 


49 


.810 


CATCHERS. 










Pol 






Passed 


Total 


Per 


00 1. 


Assists 


Brrori 


hulls. 


chances. 


cent. 


480 


123 


8 


4 


585 


.979 


162 


SO 


7 


2 


JL'l 


.'.I.V.I 


585 


189 


24 


9 


787 


.988 


135 


44 


E 


3 


187 


.967 


lllo 


42 


4 


5 


211 


.957 


816 


00 


9 


10 


401 


. 863 


288 


IT, 


» 


8 


351 


. BBS 


251 


BB- 


7 


10 


3511 


!i. r ,2 


188 


SS 


7 


5 


245 


.051 


201 


71 


7 


7 


286 


.981 


MB 


81 


8 


13 


417 


.880 


::im 




14 


18 


BIO 


(117 


09 


27 


4 


2 


KIL- 


.941 


866 


B8 


14 


17 


189 


.937 




VII 


25 


2 


■mi 


.935 


lllll 


214 


24 


24 


002 


.927 


288 


82 


22 


8 


347 


.914 


180 


82 


17 


10 


295 


.908 




Games won and lost with percentage of victories of 
participated in the championship campaign 

No. Games Games Games 

Name and Club. Pitched In. Won. Lost. 

Ames, New York 2 2 

Leever, Pittsburg 36 25 7 

Winham, Pittsburg 5 3 1 

Thatcher, Brooklyn I 3 1 

Phillippe, Pittsburg 86 25 9 

Weimer, Chicago 85 20 8 

Mathewson, New York . . . . IT. 30 13 

Wicker, St Louis, Chicago . 20 9 

Doheny, Pittsburg 27 16 8 

Hahn, Cincinnati 34 22 12 

Sutthoff, Cincinnati 30 16 9 

Schmidt, Brooklyn 40 22 13 

Veil, Pittsburg 12 5 3 

Wilholm, Pittsburg 12 5 3 

McGinnity. Now York .... 55 31 20 

Taylor. J- Chicago 37 21 14 

Cronin, New York 20 6 4 

Kennedy, Pittsburg 18 9 6 

Jones, Brooklyn 88 19 14 

Lundgrcn. Chicago 27 11 9 

Phillips, Cincinnati 16 7 6 

Swing, Cincinnati 29 14 13 

Taylor, L.. New York .... 33 13 13 

Thompson, Pittsburg .... 5 2 2 

Hardy. Chicago 3 1 1 

Harper, Cincinnati 17 8 9 

Reidy, Brooklyn 15 6 7 

Garvin, Brooklyn 38 15 18 

Pittenger. Boston 44 18 22 

DogffUby, Philadelphia ... 36 13 16 

Menefee, Chicago 20 8 10 

Carney, Boston 10 4 5 

Ounleavy, St. Louis 14 6 8 

Sparks, Philadelphia .... 28 11 15 

Williams. Chic, l'hila., Boston ,13 5 7 

Fraser. Philadelphia :il 12 17 



all pitchers who 


of 1903. 




Tie 


P.C. 


Games. 


of Vic. 





1.000 


1 


.781 





.750 





.750 





.755 


1 


.714 


1 


.698 





.690 





.667 





.647 





.640 


1 


.629 





.625 





.625 





.608 





.600 


1 


.600 





.600 


1 


.576 





.550 





.538 


l 


.519 





.500 





.500 





.500 





.471 


1 


.461 





.455 


1 


.450 





.448 





.444 


1 


.444 





.429 


1 


.423 





.417 


2 


.414 



PITCHERS' RECORD (Continued). 
\'<». Game I iamea 

Pitched In. 

. . . 28 



1^»M1 . 

13 
H 

16 
18 

14 
8 
9 

13 
8 

19 

.-> 
M 

3 
U 



Name and Club. 
Brown. St. Louis . . 

Mitchell. Philadelphia .... 28 

Halarkey, Boston 32 

Willis. Boston 33 

Piatt, Boston 2"> 

Rhoades, SI. Louis 17 

Lvans. Brooklyn v> 

Poole, Cincinnati 25 

Murphy. St. Louis 16 

McFarland, St. Louis .... 28 

Miller, New York 1.", 

Currie, St. Lords, Chicago. . . 28 

Hacked, S;. Louis 7 

O'Neill, St. Louis 19 

Falkenberg, P 

Sanders. St. Louis g 

McFetridge, Philadelphia ... 1-1 

Betts, St. Louis 1 

Graham, Chicago 1 

. St. Louis 1 

Moren, Pittsburg 1 

Scanlon, Pittsburg 1 

Yerkes, St. Louis 1 

Wigfrs. Cincinnati 2 

Moran, St. Louis 3 

Doscher, Chicago, Brooklyn . . 4 

Victors, Brooklyn 4 

Itavcan. Cincinnati 3 2 

il, Philadelphia .... 6 3 

Thielman. Brooklyn 4 3 

3 3 

McLaughlin, Philadelphia . . 3 3 

1 trn, Philadelphia ... 4 1 

St. Louis 3 

Bartley. New York 1 

Booker, Cincinnati 1 

Merritt. Pittsburg 1 

Milton. St. Lout] 1 

Pounds, Brooklyn | n n 

Stanley, Boston .1 q n 

Taylor. St. Louis 1 n q 

be last eight. Lovett pitched in parts of 1 
pitehed part of one game only. 



Won. 
9 

11 
11 
12 

9 

5 

5 

7 

4 

9 

2 

5 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 


















o 











u 




Tie 
Games, 

o 
1 






1 




1 








P.C. 

of Vic. 
.409 

.ins 

.400 
.391 

.350 
.333 
.321 
.286 
.263 
.250 
.235 
.167 
.143 
.083 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 

.000 

.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
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.000 

,000 

.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
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PALO I |s 



OFFICIAL LEAGUE W 



^HRANTK" 



I 






z 









The Spalding Official League Ball. 
Used exclusively by the National League, Minor 
Leagues, and by all Intercollegiate and other Associ- 
ations for over a quarter of a century. Each ball 
wrapped in tinfoil and put in a separate box, and 
sealed in accordance with the regulations of the 
National League and American Association. War- 
ranted to last a full game when used under ordinary 
conditions. .No. 1. "Official" League Ball. Each, |1.25 



A. C. SPALDINC Sl BROS. 



New York Chicago Philadelphia 

Boston Baltimore Buffalo 

St. Louis MinneaiH-li.; D'-nv.-r 

London, England 



San Y\, 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 




The Spalding Official Boys' League Ball. 

Combining all the excellent qualities of our National 
League Ball, and is carefully made in every particu- 
lar. It is especially designed for junior clubs (com- 
posed of boys under sixteen years of age), and all 
games in which this ball is used will be recognized 
as legal games, the same as if played with the Official 
League Ball. Each ball put up in separate box and 
sealed, and warranted to last a full game. 

No. IB. Each, 75c. 



New York 

Boston 
St. Louis 



A. C. SPALDING &. BROS. 



Chicago 

Baltimore 

Minneapolis 



Philadelphia 
Buffalo 

Denver 



London, Kngland 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 




Spalding's 'Varsity League Ball. 
Regulation size and weight, fine selected horsehide 
cover, rubber centre, all wool yarn and far superior 
in material and workmanship to any of the various 
imitations of our Official League Ball. Warranted to 
last a full game without losing its elasticity or 
shape No. X. Each, $1.00 

Spalding's Interscholastic League Ball. 
Same quality as the 'Varsity League, but smaller 
in size. Each ball in scaled box and warranted to 
last a full game No. XB. Each, 50c. 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York Chicago Philadelphia San Francisco 

Boston Baltimore Buffalo Kansa 

St. Louis Minn- Denver Montreal, Can. 

London, England 



THE A. G. SPALDING AUTOGRAPH BATS 



Made with Tape Wound, Pitch Twine Wound. Combed (Patented 
Roughening Process), or Plain Handle. 



tSHSH 



~~""'" 






Boys' Size. Tape Wound Handle. 

The A. G. Spalding Autograph Base Ball Bni 
cently introduced by us have made a pronounced hit 
wiih the leading batsmen. In quality of material and 
every other necessity requisite lor a first-class article 
we believe them to he the best bats ever turned out. 
The models are those used hy the best players, and 
the autograph stamped on each is a guarantee that 
every one has passed the closest inspection and is 
perfect— judged according to our knowledge of base 
ball players' needs — gained after an experience of 
twenty-eight years in the manufacture of base ball 
bats. The timber is seasoned for three years — not 
kiln-dried, but seasoned in open slieds; then, after a 
general inspection ii ed under the critical eyes 

of men trained in a factory particularly well equipped 
for turning out this class of goods. We know of 
nothing that can be done to make an inspection more 
rigid, and place these bats before our customers as the 
finest in every particular that we can turn out. 

Tape Wound Handle Each, ?1.00 

Pitch Twine Wound Handle " 1.00 

Combed Handle, Patented Roughening 

Process .75 

Plain Handle " .75 

Boys - Size. Tape Wound Handle " .50 



A. C. SPALDING &. BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



Chicago 

Baltimore 
Minneapolis 



Philadelphia 

Buffalo 
Denver 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal. Can. 



London. England 



The Spalding Mushroom Bat 

Patented 

In this bat a principle has been utilized which 
makes a bat of the same weight many times 
more effective than the ordinary style under 
certain conditions, and as an all-around bat we 
have received many letters from prominent 
players testifying to the good points of its con- 
struction. Timber is the same as that used in 
our best "Autograph" bats. The knob arrange- 
ment at the end enables us to get a more even 
distribution of weight than is possible under 
the old construction, and for certain kinds of 
play the bat is practically invaluable. 

The Spalding Mushroom Bat. Each, $1.00 

For :i long time 1 have been trying to find b bat that 
JPljH would balance when choking. No( unl n i used the Mush 
I room Bat, Invented by Jack Pickett, have I found a bat 
that was up to ray Idea. This bat is used exclusively by 
the New York players. Yours truly. 

JOHN J. McGRAW, 
Manager New York 11. IS. Club. 
In all my experience flS a base ball player I have not 
found ii more sat Isfactory base ball bat than the Spalding 
Mushroom Bat. The timber is The best 1 have seen; the 
balauee and model of the ba1 are perfect. 

Yours truly, JAMBS J. CALLAHAN, 

Manager-Captain Chicago American League Club. 
I have played professional base ball for the lust fifteen 
years and have t ried nil kinds of ha Is. but no bat has 

given me such good service aa the Spalding Haahrooni r.ai. 
Introduced by Jack Pickett. Quality and balance are per- 
fect. Yours truly. \VM. GLEASON, 

Captain Philadelphia National League B. B, Olub. 
The Spalding Mushroom Bat, Introduced by Jack Pickett, 
receives my lu-arty I'lidorst-rnent. My exp< a ball 

player enables me to thoroughly appreciate Its good quali- 
ties. Yours truly. OH as. a. OOMISKEY, 
President Chicago American League Club. 
In all of out- experience as base ball players we have 
not found a bat more satisfactory than the Spalding Mash- 
Bat Introduced by Jack Pickett 
7AS F. SLAGLB, l>. JONES, J. KoCARTHY. 
J. KLI.Vi, .John BVERS, DB, J. P. CASEY, 
F. I.. CHANCE, JOH TINKER, 

»>r Chicago National League Club. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Baltimore Buffalo 

Minneapolis Denver 

London. England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 



SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BATS 



Since 1877, when we intro- 
duced the Spalding" line of 
trade-marked bate, tl.ey have 
been recognized as standard by 
players to whom quality ta 
a consideration. 
Wherever pos- 
sible, we have 
improved both 
style and qual- 
ity from time 
to time, and 
the assortment 
as now made 
u p . comprises 
absolutely the 
most u p- to- 
date and thor- 
oughly tni st- 
worthy styles 
that can be 
produced. The 
timber used in 
their construc- 
tion is seasoned 
from two to 
three years be- 
fore using, thus 
ensuring* not 
only a lighter 
and stronger 
bat, but also re- 
taining the life 
quality and 

I driving power 

I of the natural 
JMi wood . 

Co. .i-o. Spalding's Black End Wagon Tongue 
Quality. Handle roughened by our patented 
grip. 






I 






Asii Bat, League 
process For better 



Each, 



No. ox. Spalding's Block End "Axletree" Bat, Bnesl stta 

(trained nsh. Improved models Each, 

No. 2X. Spalding's Burnt finish Bat, extra quallt) ash. Bach, 
No. 4. Spalding's Black End Willow Bat, Mghly ttnlahed 

polished, and strongest Unlit wood hat made Each, 



50c. 
Ighl 

.:...■ 
25c. 
and 
2Bc. 



BOYS' BATS 
No, ::x. Spalding's Bnrnl End luni gnsJtty 

ash ; lengths SO snd 38 In Baca, 26c. 

No. IXB. Spalding's Boy's Bat, selected Quality ash. p 

and varnished; high Bnlsh; length 80 In 1'"-'. 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York Chicago Philadelphia 

Boston Baltimore Buffalo 

St. Louis. Minneapolis Denver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 



How 

About 

Your 

Bat? 




IE YOU HAVE AN OLD HAT THAT IS JUST RIGHT, OB A 
BROKEN BAT THAT YOU WISH DUPLICATED, SEND JT To 

\ND WE WILL MAKE vor 
AN EXACT DUPLICATE AT THE 
BEGULAR PRICE OF $1.00 EACH. 
WE WILL KEEP THE MODEL OF 
YOUR BAT AT OUR FACTORY, 
SO THAT YOU CAN RE-ORDER 
AT ANY TIME. OUR HIGHEST 
QUALITY BATS ARE MADE FROM 
THE VERY BEST SELECTED 
SECOND GROWTH WHITE ASH, 
GROWN ON HIGH LAND AND UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES 
DO WE USE SWAMP OB LOWLAND ASH INI THESE BATS, 

Our bats are mado under the supervision of Jack Pickett, who baa 
n titled with bale ball for the past sixteen years, having play '"I 
With the National. League*. Mr. Pickett is 

undoubtedly e .■ ball hats in the I 

thoroughly familiar with the players' wants. 

CATAI.OOITK OF ATHLETIC SPORTS I 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 

Boston 
St. Louis 



;'" Philadelphia 

Baltji Buffalo. 

polis Denver 



San Francisco 
■ al. Can. 




Catchers' 

Masks 



Spalding's 
Sun Protecting Mask. 

Finest steel wire, extra 

heavy black enamelled; 

our patent sunshade pro- 

I lie eyes without ob- 

Btructlng the view. 

No. 4-0. Each. $4.00 



Spalding's 
Special League Mask. 

BLACK ENAMELLED. 
Made of extra heavy and 
>"' sl annealed steel wire 
Fit *lngs of best 
throughout. 



quality 



No. 2-0. Each, $2.50 




New York 
Boston 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

Philadelphia San ]■' 



Chicago 

Baltimore Buffalo 

ipolts Denver 

London, Knirland 



Kitnsji 

i!. Can. 







Spalding's 
Neck Protecting Mask. 

Finest steel wire, extra 
heavy and black enamelled 
to prevent reflection of 
light; our patent neck ex- 
tension affords absolute 
protection to the neck. 

No. 3-0. Each, $3.00 



Spalding's 
Regulation League Mask. 

Made of heavy, soft an- 
nealed steel wire. Well fin- 
ished and reliable in every 
particular. 

BLACK i:na\ii:i.i.kii. 
No. OX. Each, $2.00 

BRIGHT WISE. 

No. 0. Each, $1.50 




A. C. SPALDING &. BROS. 



New York 
Boeb m 

St. Louis 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Baltimore Buffalo 

Minneapolis Denver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 



Spald 




ing's Inflated Body Protectors. 

The only practical de 
vice for the protection of 
catchers and umpires. 
Made of best rubber, In- 
flated with air; light and 
pliable. When not in use 
the air may be let out and 
the protector rolled in a 
very small space. 
No. 0. League Catchers' 

Protector. .. .Each, |5.00 
No. 1. Amateur Catch- 
ers' Protector. Each, $3.50 
No. 2. Boys' Catchers' 
Protector ....Each, $2.0« 

Umpires Body Protectors. 
Made to order only. Pat- 
tern showing exact size 
and shape desired must be 
sent with ordeT. 

Each, $10.00 

Spalding's Bases. 

Complete with straps 
and .spikes. Three bases 
In ;i set. 

No. 0. League Club 
Bases, extra quality 
canvas, and quilted. 

Per set. $G.0O 
No. 1. Canvas Bases, 
well made, not quilt- 
ed Per set, $4.50 

No. 2. Canvas Bases, 
ordinary quality, 

Per set, $3.00 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York Chicajro Philadelphia San Francisco 

Boston Baltimore Buffalo Kansas City 

St. Louis Minneapolis Denver Montreal. Can. 

I>ondon. England 








Spalding's "Perfection" Catchers' Mitt. 
For years our No. 7-0 Mitt has been considered as 
near perfection as it was possible to come in making 
an article of this kind. The leather is of finest quali- 
ty calfskin, padding of best hair felt obtainable and 
every other detail of manufacture has been carefully 
considered, including patent lace back with rawhide 
lacing. Thumb is reinforced and laced, double row 
of stitching on heel pad and strap-and-buckle fasten- 
ing at back No. 7-0 Each, $6.00 

Spalding's "Professional" Catchers' Mitt. 
Is exactly the same as our Perfection No. 7-0 Mitt, 
but is smaller In Blze and has no heel pad. Made par- 
ticularly for professional players and is highly en- 
dorsed by them. Reinforced and laced at thumb, pat- 
ent laced back, and strap-and-buckle fastening at back. 

No. 7-OS. Bach, $6.00 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



Chicago 

Baltimore 
Minneapolis 

London, 



Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Denver 
England 



San Fr: i 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can, 




Spalding's 
League Mitt. 
Made of ; 
special tanned leath- 
er, very soft and pli- 
able, heavily padded. 
An old favorite. 
No. 5-0. Each, $4.00 

Spalding's 
No. OA Mitt. 
Extra large and 
heavily padded. Vel- 
vet tanned boulevard 
and special tanned 
leather finger - piece 
and back. Extreme- 
ly well made. 
No. OA. Each, $2.00 



Spalding's No. 

Face, sides and 
Piece made of 
velvet tanned boule- 
vard and the bai 
selected asbestos 
buck, well padded. 
Well known for reli- 
ability. 

No. O. Each, $2.50 

"Decker Patent. 

Made same aa our 
No. O Mitt, with the 
addition of a heavy 
piece of sole lea 
on back for extra 
protection to the 
band and i 
No. OX. Each, $3.00 



O Mitt. 




N... OX 



A. C. SPALDING 4. BROS. 

New York Chicajro Philadelphia San Francisco 

«oston_ ugjjjj Buflalo Kansas City 

St Louis Minneaiwilis Denver Montreal, Can. 

London, England 



SPALDING'S FIRST BASEMEN'S MITTS 




Spalding's No. BX First Basemen's Mitt. 
Highest quality material and workmanship and 
adapts Itself to the conformation of the hand without 
undue straining. Made of fine selected and specially 
tanned calfskin, extremely well made throughout and 
padded to meet the special requirements of a base- 
man's mitt; laced all around and strap-and-buckle fast- 
ening at back: double row of stitching on heel pad. 

No. BX. First Basemen's Mitt. Bach. $3.50 

No. BXS First Basemen's Mitt. 
Composed of same quality materials and workman- 
ship same as in our Xo. BX First Basemen's Mitt. It 
has no heel pad and is made up especially for profes- 
sional use. 

No. nxs. First Basemen's Mitt Bach, $3.50 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 

Boston 

St. Louis 



Chicago 
Baltimore 
MliwuaapoBg 



Philadelphia 
Buffalo 



London, Kntdaml 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal. Can. 




Spalding's 
No. PX Infielders' Glove. 
Our No. PX Infielders' 
Glove is made up on 
lines suggested by promi- 
nent professional players. 
Quality and workmanship 
cannot be surpassed. The 
quality of buckskin used In 
making up tins glove is the 
Mm. 81 we have been able to 
obtain, and all other items 
of manufacture have been 
carefully looked into. It 
is heavily padded around 
with fine quality 
felt, and padding extends 
well up into the little fin- 
ger. Has no heel pad, but is made extra long to pro- 
tect wrist. No. PX. Infielders' Glove. Each, $3.00 

Spalding's 
No. 2X Infielders' Glove. 
This glove has retained 
its popularity from year to 
year and to-day is ac- 
knowledged to be the most 
practical in style and get- 
up of any on the market 
Made of selected velvet 
tanned buckskin, lined and 
correctly padded with Un- 
it Has web thumb, 
i quality workman- 
ship throughout; double 
row of Batching oil heel 
bad. No better made at 
any price. 

No. 2X. Bach, P 




A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
Bt I.<»uis 



Philadelphia 

Balthl Italo 

MhuMapoHa :ver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal. Con. 



Spalding's Base Ball Shirts. 
"The Spalding" Shirt, any 
style, with name of club. 

Each, $6.00 
"University" Shirt, any 
style, with name of club. 

Each, $5.00 
"Interscholastic" Shirt, any 
style, with name of club. 

Each, $4.00 
"Club Special" Shirt, any 
style, with name of club. 

Each, $2.75 
"Amateur Special" Shirt. 
any style, with name of 
club. Each, $2.00 

"Junior" Shirt, any style, 
with name of club. 

Each, $1.50 
"Youths' " Shirt, button 
front, 1 letter on front 
only. Each, $1.00 

Detachable sleeves 25 cents 
each shirt extra. 

Spalding's Base Ball Pants. 
"The Spalding" Pants, any 

style. Per pair, $6.00 

"University" Pants, any 

style. Per pair, $5.00 

"Interscholastic" Pants, any 

style. Per pair, $3.75 

"Club Special" Pants, any 

style. Per pair, $2.75 

"Amateur Special" Pants, 

padded. Per pair, $2.00 

"Junior" Pants, padded. 

Per pair, $1.50 
"Youths' " Pants, padded. 

Per pair, $1.25 



«0!M» 



m 






New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



SPALDING & BROS. 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Baltimore Buffalo 

Minneapolis Denver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 




The 

Spalding 

Uniform 

No. 



HIGHEST GRADE MADE 



The workmanship and material of this outfit is of 
the very highest quality throughout, and special care 
has been taken lo make this uniform superior to 
anything offered in this line. Used exclusively by all 
league and professional clubs for years pas! is suf- 
ficient evidence of its quality and durability. Colors: 
White, Pearl Gray, Yale Gray, Light Gray, Black, 
Maroon, Royal Blue, Navy Blue, Brown, Green, 
Cardinal. 

The Spalding Uniforn No. 

COMPLETE $15. 60 

Cotwistina of 

The Spalding Shirt, any style 

The Spalding Pants, any style 

The Spalding Stockings. No. 3-0 

The Spalding Cap, any style 

The Spalding Web Belt, leather lined 



J FOR <M 7 Cf) 

erSuit. S? I L*.J\J 



NET PRICE TO CLUBS ORDERING 
KMTlia-; TEAM Per 

No extra charge for lettering shirts with name of club 

DETACHABLE SLEEVES, 23 CENTO BACH S1I1UT EXTRA 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Baltimore Buffalo 

Minneapolis Denver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal. Can. 



BASE BALL, CAPS 
our line of cap* i* unequalled for quality, style and workman- 
ship. We mak«- them in seven Ailtgrenl grades and the various 
styles in Qualities onlj .- s Indicated under each cut. When order- 
ing, be sure and state Style Number, Size, Quality and Color. 




No. 21— Collet' Style. Hade In all finalities. 




No. 25— Boston Style. Made In 0, 
and 3d Qualltiea. 



QUALITY. White, 
Pear] < I ra r, 5fa le i 
Light Gray, Black, 

Miu n, KoyaJ Blue, 

Navy Blue, Brown, 
Green, Cardinal. 
Bach, 81.00. 

1st QUALITY. White, 
Pearl Gray, Vale < Iras . 
Light Gray, Black, 

■ ■:i. Royal 
Navy Blue, Brown, 
< Ireen, Cardinal. 
Bach 90c. 

2d QUALITY. White, 
Pearl Gray, Sale Gray, 
Light Gray, Black, 
Maroon, Boyal Blue, 
Navy Blue, Brown, 
Green, < Jardinal. 
i, 80c. 

8d QUALITY. White, 
Pearl Gray, Yale < Iray, 
Light Gray, Black, 
Maroon, Royal Blue, 
Navy Blue, Brown, 
Cardinal. 

i . 00c. 




No, 



■Chicago style. Made in ". 1st, 
2d, 3d, Hi. and 6th .pmlitles. 



4th Qt'ALITY. White. 

Light Gray. B 

m Mix, Ma 
roon, Nitvy Blue, 
Green. 

T.nr. 

5th QUALITY. Ma 
roon, Groan, Blue 

Cray. Brown MIX. 
Each, 26c. 



QUALITY, 

Maroon. 

Enrh, 25c. 



■ 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



ago 

Baltimore 
apolis 



Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Denver 
England 



San IV. 
KffllflflH City 
Montreal, fan. 




No. 17 Brooklyn Stylo, Blade in 0, 
2d and 8d qualities only. 



BASE BALL CAPS 
Our line o* caps is unequalled for quality, style and workman- 
ship. We make them In seven different gradea and the various 
stylet In qualities onlj aa Indicated antler each cnt, When order- 
ing, be sure and state Style Number, Size, Quality and Color. 



QUALITY. White, 
Pea rl ' fray, Sale Gray, 
Light Gray, Black, 
Maroon, Royal Blue, 
\avy Bine, Brown* 
Green, Cardinal. 
Each, Sl.uo. 

1st QUALITY. White, 
Pearl Gray, 'i alt- Gray, 
Light Gray, Black, 
Maroon, Royal Bloc, 
Navy Bine, Brown, 
Green, Cardinal. 
Bach 90c. 

2d quality. White, 
Pearl Gray, Yah- Gray, 
Light Gray, Black, 
Maroon, Royal Bine, 
Navy Bine, Brown, 
Green, i !a rdinal. 
Bach, 80c. 

3d QUALITY. White, 

Pean Gw 

Light Gray, Black, 

Maroon, Royal Bine, 

Navy Blue, Brown, 

Cardinal. 

Each, 60c. 

4th QUALITY. White, 
Lijrht Gray, Blue 
Gray, Brown Mix. Ma- 
roon, Navy Blue, 
Oreen. 

Bach, BOc. 

5th QUALITT. Mn- 
roon, Green, Blue 

: MU. 

6th QUALITT. Gray, 
Maroon. 

Bach, 29c. 




\... 



23— university Style. m 

2nd and 8d qoalitiea only. 




N... iff— Philadelphia Style. Stitched Vfao 
Made In 0, is*. 2d and 3d qnaUtlea only. 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
St. LOQU 



Ball Inn 

Loncb 



delphia 
Buffalo 
Den . i 
land 



San Francisco 

Kansas City 
Montreal, (an. 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL 
STOCKINGS 




Our "Highest Quality" 
Stockings are superior to 
anything ever offered for 
athletic wear, and combine 
all the essentials of a per- 
fect stocking. They are all 
wool, have white feet, are 
heavy ribbed, full fash- 
ioned, hug the leg closely 
but comfortably, and are 
very durable. The weav- 
ing is of an exclusive and 
unusually handsome de- 
sign. 



No. 3-0. Plain colors, white feet... Per pair, $1.50 

No. 3-OS. Striped, white feet, made to order only; 

any color Per pair, $ 1 .75 

Colors : Black, Navy, Maroon and Cardinal. 

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue mailed free 
to any address in the United States or Canada. 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 

Boston 
St. Jjouis 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Baltimore Buffalo 

Minneapolis Denver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas * 3 i l y 
Monlred. CajTi. 



SPALDING'S 




J*L 


BASE BALL 




,4&^&k 


STOCKINGS 




'mbr 


Striped, Ribbed 




pnnti 


Best quality, all wool; 




msm 


stripes 2-inch, alternate. 






Colors: Scarlet and Black, 




WWIID7 


Navy and Red, Orange and 




Mb 


Black, Maroon and White, 




Royal Blue and White, 




j 


Royal Blue and Black, 




MiWln 


Navy and White. Other 






colors to order only; prices 




^p||l||P 


on application. ( 






No. IRS. Heavy weight.. 




. . . Per pair, ?1.35 


No. 2RS. Medium weight 




1.10 


No. 3RS. Good weight . . . 




80 


Plain Colors. 




Colors : Black, Navy, Maroon, Royal Blue, 


Scarlet and Cardinal. 


No. 1R. Heavy weight, all 


wool , 


Per pair, $100 


No. 2R. Medium weight, all wool 


.80 


No. 3R. Good weight, wool legs 


and 


cotton feet . . . 




.60 


No. 4R. Cotton 




.25 


A. C. SPALDI 


NC & 


BROS. 


New York Chicago 
Boston Baltimore 
St. Lo Minneapolis 

London, 


Philadelphia San Francisco 
Buffalo Kansas City 
Denver Montreal, Can, 
England 




The Spalding Highest Quality Base Ball Shoe. 

Our "Highest Quality" Base Ball Shoe is hand-made 
throughout and of specially selected kangaroo leather. 
Extreme care is taken in its general construct ion, and 
no pains or expense spared in making this shoe not 
only of the very highest in quality, but a perfect shoe 
in every detail. The plates, made exclusively for this 
shoe, are of the finest band-forged razor steel and 
firmly riveted to heel and sole. 

No. 2-0. "Highest Quality." Per pair, $6.00 

A special new light weight razor steel hand-forged 
plate used on all our best grai 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



Chicago 

Baltimore 

Minneapolis 



Philadelphia 

Buffalo 

Denver 



London, Knsrland 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can. 





Spalding's Beveled Edge Shoe Plates. 
Razor steel. 

No. 3-0. Toe Plates Per pair, 50c. 

No. 4-0. Heel Plates Per pair, 60c. 

Spalding's League Plates. 
Steel specially hardened, sharpened edges. 

No. 0. Toe Plates Per pair, 25c. 

No. 2-0. Heel Plates Per pair, 25c. 

Professional Shoe Plates. 
Best quality steel. 

No. 1. Toe Plates Per pair, 10c. 

No. 1H. Heel Plates Per pair, 10c. 

Spalding's Pitchers' Toe Plate. * 

Worn on the toe and af- 
fords a thorough protection 
to the shoe, and at the 
same time a most valuable 
assistant in pitching. 
Made for right or left shoe, 
by all professionals. 

No. A. Aluminum, 

Each, 50c. 
No. B. Brass. . .Each, 25c. 




A. C. SPALDINC &. BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Louis 



Chicago Philadelphia 

Baltimore Buffalo 

Minneapolis Denver 

London, England 



San Francisco 
Kansas City 
Montreal, Can, 



The Hackey Patent Ankle Supporter. 




No. H 



No.SH 



No.CH 



An ankle support of some kind has now come to be 
recognized as a necessity by most athletes. The styles 
which we manufacture under the Hackey Patent have 
given universal satisfaction, and are absolutely reli- 
able and practically perfect in construction and 
design. They are worn over or under stocking and 
support the ankle admirably, while not Interfering in 
any way with free movements. Relieve pain imme- 
diately and cure a sprain in a remarkably short time. 
In ordering, give size of shoe worn. 

No. II. Made of soft tanned leather, best quality. 

Per pair, $1.00 
No. SH. Good quality sheepskin, lined, bound and 
reinforced Per pa i 

No. CH. Black duck, lined and bound, leather rein- 
forced per pair, 25c. 

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of athl.-tii- good*) 
mailed free to any address. 



A. C. SPALDING A. 



New York 
Boston 

St. Louis 



Chicago iddpMa 

Baltimore 

Minneapolin 1 1. 

I>»ndon, En: 






BROS. 

San Francisco 
Kansas City 



tl, (an. 




Spalding's Bat Bags. 

No. 2. Spalding's Canvas Bat Bag. made of 
heavy waterproof canvas, leather reinforced at 
ends; will hold 12 bats Each, $3.00 

No. 3. Same as above; to hold 6 bats Each, $1.75 

Individual Bat Bags. 
No. 01. Spalding's Sole Leather Bat Bag, for two 

bats; used by all League players Each, $3.00 

No. 02. Heavy waterproof canvas, leather cap at 

both ends Bach, $1.25 

No. 03. Heavy canvas, leather cap at one end. 

Each, 80c. 




Spalding's Uniform Bags. 

The convenient packing of uniforms in a manner 

thai win cot wrinkle and soil same, ami to )»• easily 

■I. is an Importanl Item to every player. We 

We designed a roll or bag Which answers all reqiiire- 

i I abstantially made, very durable, and 

has separate compartments for shoes, etc. 

anvas Each, $2.50 

No. 2. Pine bag leather " B0 ° 



New Y.,rk 

Bo i.,,, 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 



-w Philadelphia 

'.iln 

I "■■river 

London, England 



San Fn 
Kansas « " i t y 
Montreal. < 'an 







Spalding's Umpire Indicator. 
No. 0. Made of celluloid; exact size, Sxl 1 /. In. En- 
dorsed and used by all League umpires Each, 50c. 



~>v 



RUNS V, 

HOME W V — 'VISITING- 

CLUB om CLU3 

© 



* 



^s 



SPALDINCS SCORING TABLET 



Spalding's Scoring Tablet. 
No. 1. A simple, convenient and accurate device 
for the record of runs and outs. It Is made of cellu- 
loid and can be carried in any vest pocket. .Each, 25c. 
Score Books. 

Pocket Score Books. 

Paper cover, 7 games Each, 

Board cover, 22 games " 

Board cover, 46 games 

Club Soon Books. 

Board cover, 30 games Bach, 

Cloth cover, 60 games 

Cloth cover. 90 s-'amcs " 

Cloth rover, 1 " 



No. 


1. 


No. 


2. 


No. 


:;. 


No. 


4. 


No. 


5. 


No. 


8. 


No. 


7. 



.10 
.26 

.50 



Score cards | 



.7:. 
1.36 
l to 

2.00 



A. C. SPALDINC &. BROS. 



New York 
Boston 
St. Loah 



Chicago 



fan Franciaco 

; 



anafll